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Dawn Dog Fight, Mick Mannock VC by Graeme Lothian (AP) - AviationArtPrints.com

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Dawn Dog Fight, Mick Mannock VC by Graeme Lothian (AP)


Dawn Dog Fight, Mick Mannock VC by Graeme Lothian (AP)

High above the trenches in April 1918, 74 Squadron engage the famed JG 1 led by the renowned ace baron von Richthofen in his distinctive bright red DR 1. Edward Mick mannock flying a SE5.a diving down top engage another Fokker Dr1 as the red baron flies past momentarily catching each others eyes. The new CO of 74 squadron, major Grid Caldwell MC (bar) New Zealands top ace can be seen above entering the dog fight. But it would be Mannock who would go on to great fame. with 61 confirmed victories and to win the VC, DSO (bar) and MC (bar) After 74 squadron he replaced Billy Bishop of CO 85 Squadron on the 3rd July 1918, scoring 46 victories in the Se5.a He was killed by ground fire near Lestram, France on the 26th July 1918. his Victoria Cross being gazetted on the 18th July 1919. The red baron CO of the Richthofens Flying circus didnt survive the month, also killed by ground fire on the 21st April, he was buried by the Allies with full military honours.
Item Code : DHM1296APDawn Dog Fight, Mick Mannock VC by Graeme Lothian (AP) - This EditionAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout! Buy 1 Get 1 Half Price!
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Limited edition of 50 artist proofs.

Image size 25 inches x 16 inches (64cm x 41cm)Artist : Graeme Lothian£15 Off!Now : £130.00

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Other editions of this item : Dawn Dog Fight, Mick Mannock VC by Graeme Lothian.DHM1296
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PRINT Signed limited edition of 1150 printsImage size 25 inches x 16 inches (64cm x 41cm)Artist : Graeme Lothian£60 Off!
Supplied with one or more free art prints!
Now : £80.00VIEW EDITION...
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Limited edition of 50 giclee canvas prints. Image size 36 inches x 24 inches (91cm x 61cm)Artist : Graeme Lothian
on separate certificate
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GICLEE
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Limited edition of 50 giclee canvas prints. Image size 30 inches x 20 inches (76cm x 51cm)Artist : Graeme Lothian
on separate certificate
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POSTCARDPostcard Postcard size 6 inches x 4 inches (15cm x 10cm)noneAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!£2.00VIEW EDITION...
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Signed limited edition of 1150 prints

TWO PRINTS ONLY IN THIS SPECIAL NEWSLETTER PROMOTION.
Image size 25 inches x 16 inches (64cm x 41cm)Artist : Graeme Lothian
B.O.G.O.F.
Now : £130.00VIEW EDITION...
EX-DISPLAY
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**Limited edition of 50 artist proofs. (One print reduced to clear)

Some marks on top of image and border which will not be very noticeable once framed.
Image size 25 inches x 16 inches (64cm x 41cm)Artist : Graeme Lothian£100 Off!Now : £45.00VIEW EDITION...

Some other related items available from this site, matching the aircraft, squadron or signatures of this item.

 The aerial battle of 21st April 1918 was notable for involving two young novice pilots, each from opposing sides, and their part in the events that followed was as significant as it was tragic. Both William Wop May and Wolfram Ulf von Richthofen had been instructed to stay out of trouble, to remain on the very outskirts should a battle occur and simply get used to being in the sky with so many other aircraft. Delighted to have been assigned to Jasta 11 under the custodianship of his older, eminent cousin, Manfred, Wolfram was eager to cut his teeth and show that he, too, could get the job done. Both he and May kept a watchful vigil over proceedings from a safe distance as battle was joined between the red-nosed Fokker DR.1s of Jasta 11, the green-tailed Albatrosses of Jasta 5 and the RFC Sopwith Camels of 209 Squadron.  Somehow, whether through carelessness or the adrenalin rush of the moment, Wolfram flew his Fokker tantalisingly close to Mays Camel who immediately gave chase, sensing that an easy first kill might just be a possibility. May quickly realised that all was not well, however, finding his guns jammed and unable to fire. He quickly broke off the attack and swooped away, but his actions had caught the attention of Manfred von Richthofen who, although engaged in a battle of his own, had been keeping a watchful eye over his young charge. The red Triplane now latched onto the tail of Mays helpless Camel and a lurid chase began along the Somme River, a chase from which the Red Baron would not return.  The young Wolfram went on to become an ace, scoring all of his eight victories in the closing months of the war, was awarded the Iron Cross 1st and 2nd and survived to be a major force in Hitlers Luftwaffe in World War Two. He was eventually taken prisoner and spent his last months in an American PoW camp where he died of a brain tumour in 1945.

Leutnant Wolfram von Richthofen by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
£300.00
 The air battle that took place above the trenches of France on the evening of 23rd September 1917 was to go down in history as one of the most extraordinary dogfights ever. The young German ace Werner Voss found himself engaged with no fewer than eleven SE5s of 56 Sqn, among them British aces such as James McCudden and Arthur Rhys Davids. Hugely outnumbered, the brave Voss saw off several British aircraft with his amazing airmanship and accuracy of fire. Again and again he could have fled the scene due to his Triplanes superior rate of climb, but his attacks were insistent and deadly. His final moments came when Rhys Davids found himself on the tail of Voss and fired both his Lewis and Vickers guns into the little turqoise Triplane which was seen to drift toward the ground, his aircraft inverting before impact, killing Voss instantly. The painting shows Voss distinctive pre-production Fokker F. 1, with the yellow nose of Jasta 10, being pursued by the SE5 of Rhys Davids while, high above,a Spad is helping to keep a gaggle of Albatross DVs at bay.

Last Dogfight of Werner Voss by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
£2.50
Von Richthofens Fokker DR 1 Triplane (Serial No 425/17) in company with his wingman in a Fokker D.VII over the fields of the Western Front early in April 1918, peeling off to attack a flight of three British fighters.
In For The Kill by Ivan Berryman. (APB)
£70.00
 Grid Caldwell, the top New Zealand Ace with 25 victories in his SE5A of 74 Squadron, is shown taking off from his home airfield during the Great War. Keith Logan (Grid Caldwell) was born 16th October 1895.  At the outbreak of World War One, Caldwell joined the territorial army.  He attempted to enlist with the New Zealand expeditionary force destined for Gallipoli but was refused.  In October 1915 he paid the sum of £100 to join the first class of the New Zealand Flying School.  In January 1916 Grid Caldwell arrived in England and was commissioned into the Royal Flying Corps in April that year.  In July 1916 he was posted to No.8 Squadron, flying BE2Cs and Ds on observation duty.  It was on 18th September 1916 his first aerial victory was scored, shooting down a Roland CII.  He transferred to 60 Squadron in November and flew Nieuport 17 fighters and was promoted to Captain in February 1917.  During this period he scored further victories, shooting down Albatros Scouts, and on 17th September was awarded the Military Cross.  In October 1917 he was posted back to England as an instructor.  In March 1918, promoted to Major, he was given command of 74 Squadron RAF flying SE5As.  The squadron under his command was credited with 140 aircraft destroyed and 85 out of control.  This tally was scored in the last eight months of the war with the loss of only 15 pilots killed or taken prisoner.  During his wartime flying, he had fought dogfights with German aces Werner Voss and Herman Becker, and he once survived a mid-air collision, bringing his badly damaged aircraft to ground level, jumping out before it crashed.  He was credited with 11 aircraft destroyed, 3 shared destroyed or captured and 10 out of control, and 1 further shared out of control.  During World War Two he was station commander at Woodbourne and later Wigram and posted to India in 1944.  After the war he was made commander of the British Empire.  He retired from the RNZAF in 1956, and sadly died of cancer in Auckland on 28th November 1980.

Grid Caldwell by Graeme Lothian. (GS)
£250.00

The Aircraft :
NameInfo
SE5The third S.E.5 produced (A4563) became, in effect, the prototype S.E.5a with a 200hp Hispano Suiza power plant and shorter span wings. The S.E.5.a went to No56, No.40 and No.60 squadrons from June 1917, and by the end of the year No's 24, 41, 68 and 84 squadron had taken them on charge. After troubles with the reduction gear of the Hispano Suiza together with a general shortage of these power plants, the direct drive Wolseley Viper became the standard S.E.5a power unit. The S.E.5.a built a fine reputation for strength, performance and general flying quality, which together with the Sopwith Camel was the main reason for the Allies gaining and maintaining air superiority during 1918. Some aircraft were fitted with four 25lb (11kg) Cooper bombs on under fuselage racks. The S.E.5.a also service in the Middle East and several home defence units in 1918. At the end of World War I over 2,000 S.E.5.a aircraft were in service with the RAF. The type had served with 24 British, 2 US and 1 Australian Squadrons. After its 'demob' 50 of these aircraft were supplied to Australia, 12 to Canada with several more to other countries including South Africa, Poland and the United States of America. 50 came onto the British register and were used for developing the art of sky-writing. The S.E.5.a will always remain one of aviation's great warplanes.
Dr.I

See our aviation history timeline for all today's historical aviation events - air victories, aircraft losses and pilot details.

RECENT UPDATES TO OUR AVIATION HISTORY DATABASES
452nd Bomb Group added to the squadrons database.
Updates made to Aircrew database for : Anton Benning : Date of death updated, Deceased updated, Squadron service dates updated
Whitley Mk.V Z6468 of No.58 Sqn RAF added to the airframes database.
New victory claim added : Do17 (Half shared victory with Sgt John Winn) claimed on 23rd November 1939 by John Evelyn Scoular of No.73 Sqn RAF
Blenheim Mk.IV V5521 of No.139 Sqn RAF added to the airframes database.
Updates made to Airframes database for : Whitley T4145 : Airframe notes updated (added 07-04-1941 : Whitley was shot down by a night-fighter and crashed at Waterhuizen near Groningen in Holland. )
Updates made to Aircrew database for : 1st Lieutenant Jay A Harrington :
Updates made to Airframes database for : Whitley T4299 : Aircrew updated (added W. N. Brindley), Airframe notes updated (added 03-04-1941 : Whitley was shot down and crashed astride of a hedge at Connegar Farm in Dorset.)
Updates made to Airframes database for : Blenheim L9270 : Airframe notes updated (added 04-04-1941 : Blenheim was on patrol off the Dutch coast before it was lost without trace. )
Updates made to Airframes database for : Wellington T2542 : Aircrew updated (added Sergeant R. Brown), Airframe notes updated (added 08-04-1941 : Wellington was shot down near Hamburg, killing all crew.)
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