Aviation Art Prints .com Home Page
Order Helpline (UK) : 01436 820269

You currently have no items in your basket

Join us on Facebook!

Payment Options Display
Buy with confidence and security!
Publishing historical art since 1985

Follow us on Twitter!
Don't Miss Any Special Deals - Sign Up To Our Newsletter!
Aircraft
Search
Squadron
Search
Artist
Search
Signature
Search

Product Search         
Click Here For Full Artist Print Indexes Aviation History Archive
Dawn Dog Fight, Mick Mannock VC by Graeme Lothian (GL) - AviationArtPrints.com

Massive savings on this month's big offers including our BUY ONE GET ONE HALF PRICE offer on many prints and many others at HALF PRICE or with FREE PRINTS!
Many of our offers end in 8 hours, 1 minute!
View our Special Offers

Dawn Dog Fight, Mick Mannock VC by Graeme Lothian (GL)


Dawn Dog Fight, Mick Mannock VC by Graeme Lothian (GL)

High above the trenches in April 1918, 74 Squadron engage the famed JG 1 led by the renowned ace baron von Richthofen in his distinctive bright red DR 1. Edward Mick mannock flying a SE5.a diving down top engage another Fokker Dr1 as the red baron flies past momentarily catching each others eyes. The new CO of 74 squadron, major Grid Caldwell MC (bar) New Zealands top ace can be seen above entering the dog fight. But it would be Mannock who would go on to great fame. with 61 confirmed victories and to win the VC, DSO (bar) and MC (bar) After 74 squadron he replaced Billy Bishop of CO 85 Squadron on the 3rd July 1918, scoring 46 victories in the Se5.a He was killed by ground fire near Lestram, France on the 26th July 1918. his Victoria Cross being gazetted on the 18th July 1919. The red baron CO of the Richthofens Flying circus didnt survive the month, also killed by ground fire on the 21st April, he was buried by the Allies with full military honours.
Item Code : DHM1296GLDawn Dog Fight, Mick Mannock VC by Graeme Lothian (GL) - This Edition
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
GICLEE
CANVAS
Limited edition of 50 giclee canvas prints.

Image size 36 inches x 24 inches (91cm x 61cm)Artist : Graeme Lothian
on separate certificate
Half
Price!
Now : 300.00

Quantity:
THE BIG SALE ... HALF PRICE SALE ... HALF PRICE SALE ... HALF PRICE SALE ... HALF PRICE SALE
THIS GICLEE CANVAS IS HALF PRICE!
For a short time, this item is being offered at half of its normal price.
We have many thousands of items like this across our website, offering great value to our customers.
Items included in the offer are changed frequently.
All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling



Other editions of this item : Dawn Dog Fight, Mick Mannock VC by Graeme Lothian.DHM1296
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Signed limited edition of 1150 printsImage size 25 inches x 16 inches (64cm x 41cm)Artist : Graeme Lothian60 Off!
Supplied with one or more free art prints!
Now : 80.00VIEW EDITION...
ARTIST
PROOF
Limited edition of 50 artist proofs. Image size 25 inches x 16 inches (64cm x 41cm)Artist : Graeme Lothian15 Off!Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!Now : 130.00VIEW EDITION...
GICLEE
CANVAS
Limited edition of 50 giclee canvas prints. Image size 30 inches x 20 inches (76cm x 51cm)Artist : Graeme Lothian
on separate certificate
Half
Price!
Now : 250.00VIEW EDITION...
POSTCARDPostcard Postcard size 6 inches x 4 inches (15cm x 10cm)noneAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!2.00VIEW EDITION...
SPECIAL
PROMOTION
Signed limited edition of 1150 prints

TWO PRINTS ONLY IN THIS SPECIAL NEWSLETTER PROMOTION.
Image size 25 inches x 16 inches (64cm x 41cm)Artist : Graeme Lothian
B.O.G.O.F.
Now : 130.00VIEW EDITION...
EX-DISPLAY
PRINT
**Limited edition of 50 artist proofs. (One print reduced to clear)

Some marks on top of image and border which will not be very noticeable once framed.
Image size 25 inches x 16 inches (64cm x 41cm)Artist : Graeme Lothian100 Off!Now : 45.00VIEW EDITION...

Some other related items available from this site, matching the aircraft, squadron or signatures of this item.

 The dramatic scene depicts an aerial dog-fight between Sopwith Camels and SE5A fighters of the Royal Flying Corps, and the bright red planes of Baron von Richthofens JG1 fighter wing. High over Northern France, the highly manoeuvrable fighters wheel and turn in the cauldron of close aerial combat, the artist bringing alive that evocative era when aerial combat first began.

Knights of the Sky by Nicolas Trudgian
180.00
 Royal Aircraft Factory S.E.5.a D3540. The Artful Dodger was the personal aircraft of Wing Commander G.H. Lewis DFC and the aircraft in which he claimed four of his twelve victories. Aircraft History: The third S.E.5 produced (A4563) became, in effect, the prototype S.E.5a with a 200hp Hispano Suiza power plant and shorter span wings. The S.E.5.a went to No56, No.40 and No.60 squadrons from June 1917, and by the end of the year Nos 24, 41, 68 and 84 squadron had taken them on charge. After troubles with the reduction gear of the Hispano Suiza together with a general shortage of these power plants, the direct drive Wolseley Viper became the standard S.E.5a power unit. The S.E.5.a built a fine reputation for strength, performance and general flying quality, which together with the Sopwith Camel was the main reason for the Allies gaining and maintaining air superiority during 1918. Some aircraft were fitted with four 25lb (11kg) Cooper bombs on under fuselage racks. The S.E.5.a also service in the Middle East and several home defence units in 1918. At the end of World War I over 2,000 S.E.5.a aircraft were in service with the RAF. The type had served with 24 British, 2 US and 1 Australian Squadrons. After its demob 50 of these aircraft were supplied to Australia, 12 to Canada with several more to other countries including South Africa, Poland and the United States of America. 50 came onto the British register and were used for developing the art of sky-writing. The S.E.5.a will always remain one of aviations great warplanes.  <br><br>Wing Commander Gwilym H. Lewis, DFC: Born 5th August, 1897, Gwilym Lewis qualified for his aviators certificate number 2116 on 27th November 1915. He was posted to France with 32 Squadron at he age of eighteen flying the DH2 single seater scout aircraft. Later after a period as an instructor he was posted as a flight commander to 40 squadron flying the famous S.E.5.a. By the end of the First World War, Gwilym Lewis had amassed a personal tally of 12 enemy aircraft destroyed and had been awarded the DFC. After leaving the RAF he went into insurance working for Lloyds Insurance Brokers, Sedgwick, Collins & Company Ltd. Shortly before the outbreak of World War II, he rejoined the RAF and became a member of Winston Churchills Joint Planning Staff in the underground Central War Room. After World War II, he resumed his successful career in insurance and retired in 1974.

SE5 Aircraft side view by M A Kinnear.
14.00
 For Manfred von Richthofen, the air battle in the skies west of Amiens on 20th April 1918 was to yield a final two victories to add to the seventy eight with which he was already credited.  But these were to be his last, the Red Baron finally succumbing the following day.  Just moments before Second Lieutenant David Lewis' 3 Sqn Sopwith Camel fell to the German's guns (the young pilot surviving to tell his story of being the Red Baron's final victim), Major Richard Raymond-Barker was not so lucky, his aircraft burning furiously until it hit the ground in a fireball near the Forest of Hamel.

The 79th Victory by Ivan Berryman. (B)
130.00
 On April 6, 1916 the RFC formed several new squadrons, including the No. 56 Squadron - Scouts. In March of 1917 the unit received the first of its new SE5s. The aircraft was disappointing to the pilots, being slower than expected, and its new Vickers machine gun with interrupter gear was next to useless. Many modifications ensued in the field, and many SE5s were fitted with Lewis guns located atop the upper wing, and in some cases an additional Lewis was installed which could be fired downward through the cockpit. In early April of 1917 No. 56 was ready to see its first combat action, and the unit headed off to France. About nine months earlier the pendulum of air superiority had swung back to the Germans. The Fokker scourge of 1915 had previously been negated by the deployment of DH2 and FE8 aircraft, but the newer German Albatros and Halberstadt fighters had regained the upper hand. The RFC was once again suffering unsustainable casualties. No. 56 Squadron was immediately pressed into service upon its deployment in France, and over the next several months gave a good account of itself. The Squadrons first victory came on April 22, and went to Albert Ball who would become a high scoring ace. On September 23, 1917 many of No. 56 Squadrons pilots would become engaged in what would be considered as one of the epic battles of early aerial warfare. At about 5:00 PM in the evening eleven SE5s took off for a routine patrol. There were heavy clouds at 9,000 feet, effectively limiting the ceiling. Several engagements took place prior to James McCudden noticing a lone SE5 from No. 60 Squadron under attack by a German triplane. Unknown to McCudden was the fact that the triplane was piloted by Werner Voss, a top German ace with 48 confirmed victories. During the next several minutes 7 SE5s focused their efforts on attacking Voss triplane. Voss had several opportunities to make a dash for the German lines, but chose to stay and fight. Demonstrating beautiful flying and determination, Voss held the massed SE5s at bay, and managed to inflict damage on each and every one. With maneuvers made so quickly and so unpredictably, none of the SE5 pilots could keep Voss in their gunsights long enough to fire a meaningful burst. Voss managed to damage two of the SE5s enough that they withdrew from the fight, and a red-nosed German Albatros joined in the fray for a short time. At one point in the battle McCudden indicated that the triplane was in the cone of tracer bullets from at least five machines simultaneously. Voss could out climb and outmaneuver all the RFC craft. Minutes later at about 2,000 feet the SE5 piloted by Arthur Rhys Davids managed to catch the German ace in a straight flat dive, and approached to within feet of the triplanes tail, firing a solid burst before pulling out of his dive. Moments later the triplane hit the ground and disintegrated. Later that evening the pilots of 56 Squadron recounted the epic battle speculating as to who might have been the pilot of the German triplane. The next morning General Trenchard sent an aide to 56 Squdron to elicit details of the battle. In this report James McCudden paid the following tribute to Voss, As long as I live I shall never forget that German pilot who single-handedly fought seven of us for ten minutes, and who put some bullets through all our machines. His flying was wonderful, his courage magnificent, and in my opinion he is the bravest German airman whom it has been my privilege to see fight.

Magnificent Courage by Stan Stokes.
35.00

The Aircraft :
NameInfo
SE5The third S.E.5 produced (A4563) became, in effect, the prototype S.E.5a with a 200hp Hispano Suiza power plant and shorter span wings. The S.E.5.a went to No56, No.40 and No.60 squadrons from June 1917, and by the end of the year No's 24, 41, 68 and 84 squadron had taken them on charge. After troubles with the reduction gear of the Hispano Suiza together with a general shortage of these power plants, the direct drive Wolseley Viper became the standard S.E.5a power unit. The S.E.5.a built a fine reputation for strength, performance and general flying quality, which together with the Sopwith Camel was the main reason for the Allies gaining and maintaining air superiority during 1918. Some aircraft were fitted with four 25lb (11kg) Cooper bombs on under fuselage racks. The S.E.5.a also service in the Middle East and several home defence units in 1918. At the end of World War I over 2,000 S.E.5.a aircraft were in service with the RAF. The type had served with 24 British, 2 US and 1 Australian Squadrons. After its 'demob' 50 of these aircraft were supplied to Australia, 12 to Canada with several more to other countries including South Africa, Poland and the United States of America. 50 came onto the British register and were used for developing the art of sky-writing. The S.E.5.a will always remain one of aviation's great warplanes.
Dr.I

See our aviation history timeline for all today's historical aviation events - air victories, aircraft losses and pilot details.

RECENT UPDATES TO OUR AVIATION HISTORY DATABASES
Blenheim Mk.IV V5521 of No.139 Sqn RAF added to the airframes database.
Wellington Mk.IC X3167 of No.149 Sqn RAF added to the airframes database.
New victory claim added : Me109 (Probable victory.) claimed on 11th November 1940 by Robert Innes of No.253 Sqn RAF
Stirling Mk.I R6011 of No.7 Sqn RAF added to the airframes database.
Wellington Mk.IC R1380 of No.214 Sqn RAF added to the airframes database.
Blenheim Mk.IV L9386 of No.139 Sqn RAF added to the airframes database.
New victory claim added : Ju87 claimed on 23rd April 1942 by Flight Lieutenant A. R. H. Barton of No.126 Sqn RAF
Updates made to Airframes database for : Hampden P4409 : Airframe notes updated (added 01-04-1941 : Hampden took off at Lindholme but swung and crashed following the collapse of the undercarriage.)
New victory claim added : Me110 claimed on 30th August 1940 by Robert Innes of No.253 Sqn RAF
New victory claim added : Ju88 claimed on 18th August 1940 by Pilot Officer A. R. H. Barton of No.32 Sqn RAF
SEARCH OUR AVIATION HISTORY DATABASES

 

Contact Details
Shipping Info
Terms and Conditions
Classified Ads
Valuations

Join us on Facebook!

Sign Up To Our Newsletter!

Stay up to date with all our latest offers, deals and events as well as new releases and exclusive subscriber content!

This website is owned by Cranston Fine Arts.  Torwood House, Torwoodhill Road, Rhu, Helensburgh, Scotland, G848LE

Contact: Tel: (+44) (0) 1436 820269.  Fax: (+44) (0) 1436 820473. Email:

Follow us on Twitter!

Return to Home Page