Aviation Art Prints .com Home Page
Order Helpline (UK) : 01436 820269

You currently have no items in your basket

Join us on Facebook!

Payment Options Display
Buy with confidence and security!
Publishing historical art since 1985

Follow us on Twitter!
Don't Miss Any Special Deals - Sign Up To Our Newsletter!
Aircraft
Search
Squadron
Search
Artist
Search
Signature
Search

Product Search         
Click Here For Full Artist Print Indexes Aviation History Archive
Max Immelmann WW1 German Ace Aviation Prints by Stan Stokes and Ivan Berryman. - AviationArtPrints.com

See our aviation history timeline for all today's historical aviation events - air victories, aircraft losses and pilot details.

STK0004. The Fokker Scourge by Stan Stokes. <p> Anthony Herman Gerard Fokker was born in the Dutch East Indies in 1890. When his father retired the Fokker family returned to Holland, where Anthony attended school. He dropped out of college, and being deemed unfit for military service, worked at a number of odd jobs. Fokkers father persuaded his son to attend an automobile mechanics school in Germany, but Anthony was disappointed and convinced his father to enroll him in a school near Mainz which offered courses in aircraft construction and flying. This endeavor was not particularly successful, and Anthony decided to build his own flying machine. He found a partner in Oberlieutenant Von Daum, a fifty-year-old officer in the German military. The aircraft was completed in 1910, and Fokker flew it successfully on a number of flights. Von Daum, unfortunately, destroyed the machine on his first attempt at flying it. The two partners then teamed with a boat-builder to construct a second aircraft. In early 1912 Anthony had organized  Fokker Aviatik GmbH with money advanced from his father. Fokker won his first contract for military aircraft in July 1913. Fokker became interested in the design of the Moraine-Saulnier, which exhibited flying characteristics far superior to the early Fokker designs. The Fokker M.5 (Eindecker I) emerged from the reengineering of a damaged Moraine-Sualnier. With the outbreak of WW I, the German military ordered large numbers of this aircraft for use as a scout. These Fokker scouts were good machines and well-liked by the pilots that flew them. Early in 1915 the French equipped their scouts with forward firing machine guns, and German losses in aerial combat increased sharply. The French system was simplistic and utilized shields on the propeller to deflect soft copper shells. Anthony Fokkers company was the first to introduce a workable machine gun synchronizer which would allow steel bullets to be used. The German military ordered the new Fokker fighter in large numbers, and by late 1915 the tide had shifted dramatically in favor of the Germans. The British press coined the term Fokker Scourge to describe this new menace which was increasing casualties to unprecedented numbers. Oswald Boelcke, and Max Immelmann were two German pilot aces who became very popular. Immelmann is depicted in Stan Stokes painting executing the aerial maneuver which took his name. Immelman received the Blue Max (Pour le Merite) to add to his Iron Cross following his eighth victory on January 12, 1916. He would officially be credited with fifteen victories prior to his death in June of 1916. The Germans maintained that a defective gun synchronizer caused Immelmann to shoot off his own propeller. <b><p> Signed limited edition of 4750 prints.  <p> Print size 16 inches x 11.5 inches (41cm x 30cm)  Supplied with signed and numbered certificate of authenticity.
DHM1565B. Max Immelmann by Ivan Berryman. <p> Max Immelmanns Fokker E.1(E13/15) shooting down a Vickers Gunbus during the Summer of 1915. Immelmann is characteristically already scouring the sky above for his next victim. <b><p> Small signed limited edition of 50 prints. <p> Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 20cm)

Please note that our logo (below) only appears on the images on our website and is not on the actual art prints.


When you are ready to add this item to your basket, click the button below.

 

 

  Website Price: 70.00  

Quantity:
 

 

Max Immelmann WW1 German Ace Aviation Prints by Stan Stokes and Ivan Berryman.

PCK2592. Max Immelmann WW1 German Ace Aviation Prints by Stan Stokes and Ivan Berryman.

Aviation Print Pack.

Items in this pack :

Item #1 - Click to view individual item

STK0004. The Fokker Scourge by Stan Stokes.

Anthony Herman Gerard Fokker was born in the Dutch East Indies in 1890. When his father retired the Fokker family returned to Holland, where Anthony attended school. He dropped out of college, and being deemed unfit for military service, worked at a number of odd jobs. Fokkers father persuaded his son to attend an automobile mechanics school in Germany, but Anthony was disappointed and convinced his father to enroll him in a school near Mainz which offered courses in aircraft construction and flying. This endeavor was not particularly successful, and Anthony decided to build his own flying machine. He found a partner in Oberlieutenant Von Daum, a fifty-year-old officer in the German military. The aircraft was completed in 1910, and Fokker flew it successfully on a number of flights. Von Daum, unfortunately, destroyed the machine on his first attempt at flying it. The two partners then teamed with a boat-builder to construct a second aircraft. In early 1912 Anthony had organized Fokker Aviatik GmbH with money advanced from his father. Fokker won his first contract for military aircraft in July 1913. Fokker became interested in the design of the Moraine-Saulnier, which exhibited flying characteristics far superior to the early Fokker designs. The Fokker M.5 (Eindecker I) emerged from the reengineering of a damaged Moraine-Sualnier. With the outbreak of WW I, the German military ordered large numbers of this aircraft for use as a scout. These Fokker scouts were good machines and well-liked by the pilots that flew them. Early in 1915 the French equipped their scouts with forward firing machine guns, and German losses in aerial combat increased sharply. The French system was simplistic and utilized shields on the propeller to deflect soft copper shells. Anthony Fokkers company was the first to introduce a workable machine gun synchronizer which would allow steel bullets to be used. The German military ordered the new Fokker fighter in large numbers, and by late 1915 the tide had shifted dramatically in favor of the Germans. The British press coined the term Fokker Scourge to describe this new menace which was increasing casualties to unprecedented numbers. Oswald Boelcke, and Max Immelmann were two German pilot aces who became very popular. Immelmann is depicted in Stan Stokes painting executing the aerial maneuver which took his name. Immelman received the Blue Max (Pour le Merite) to add to his Iron Cross following his eighth victory on January 12, 1916. He would officially be credited with fifteen victories prior to his death in June of 1916. The Germans maintained that a defective gun synchronizer caused Immelmann to shoot off his own propeller.

Signed limited edition of 4750 prints.

Print size 16 inches x 11.5 inches (41cm x 30cm) Supplied with signed and numbered certificate of authenticity.


Item #2 - Click to view individual item

DHM1565B. Max Immelmann by Ivan Berryman.

Max Immelmanns Fokker E.1(E13/15) shooting down a Vickers Gunbus during the Summer of 1915. Immelmann is characteristically already scouring the sky above for his next victim.

Small signed limited edition of 50 prints.

Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 20cm)


Website Price: 70.00  

To purchase these prints individually at their normal retail price would cost 98.00 . By buying them together in this special pack, you save 28




All prices are displayed in British Pounds Sterling

 

RECENT UPDATES TO OUR AVIATION HISTORY DATABASES
Updates made to Airframes database for : Wellington T2610 : Airframe notes updated (added 10-02-1941 : Wellington lost engine power and ditched into the North Sea. The injured crew were rescued by the SS Tovelil two days later.)
New victory claim added : Me109 (Probable victory) claimed on 2nd June 1940 by James Baird Coward of No.19 Sqn RAF
Updates made to Airframes database for : Whitley T4220 :
TrGr186 added to the squadrons database.
Updates made to Airframes database for : Wellington W5365 : Airframe notes updated (added 08-02-1941 : Wellington stalled and crashed while trying to land at Tollerton, it came down near Cotgrave. )
Updates made to Aircrew database for : D. C. Beddow : Squadrons updated (added No.51 Sqn RAF), Squadron service dates updated
Updates made to Aircrew database for : Radford : Squadrons updated (added No.51 Sqn RAF), Airframes updated (added Whitley P4981), Squadron service dates updated
Updates made to Aircrew database for : Pilot Officer Oliver Bertram Morrogh-Ryan : First name updated (now Oliver Bertram), Deceased updated, Aircraft updated, Squadrons updated (added No.68 Sqn RAF), Airframes updated, Squadron service dates updated, Rank updated (now Pilot Officer)
Updates made to Aircrew database for : Pilot Officer Rainford Gent Marland : First name updated (now Rainford Gent), Date of death updated, Deceased updated, Aircraft updated (added Hurricane), Squadrons updated (added No.229 Sqn RAF), Airframes updated (added Hurricane Z5617), Squadron service dates updated, Rank updated (now Pilot Officer)
Updates made to Aircrew database for : R. Clark : Squadrons updated (added No.78 Sqn RAF), Squadron service dates updated
SEARCH OUR AVIATION HISTORY DATABASES

 

Contact Details
Shipping Info
Terms and Conditions
Classified Ads
Valuations

Join us on Facebook!

Sign Up To Our Newsletter!

Stay up to date with all our latest offers, deals and events as well as new releases and exclusive subscriber content!

This website is owned by Cranston Fine Arts.  Torwood House, Torwoodhill Road, Rhu, Helensburgh, Scotland, G848LE

Contact: Tel: (+44) (0) 1436 820269.  Fax: (+44) (0) 1436 820473. Email:

Follow us on Twitter!

Return to Home Page