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Avro Lancaster Mk III ND845 MG-C. by M A Kinnear.


Avro Lancaster Mk III ND845 MG-C. by M A Kinnear.

Aircraft History: ND845 was one of 600 Mk III Lancasters delivered to the RAF from December 1943 to May 1944 by A V Roe (Chadderton) Delivered to No.7 Squadron, it was lost on the night of 19th/20th May 1944, whilst acting as Master Bomber on a raid against the railway marshalling yards at Le Mans. It is believed it was in collision with another No.7 Squadron Lancaster JB653 (MG - R) piloted by Squadron Leader J M Dennis - the Deputy Master Bomber. There were no survivors from either crew.

Wing Commander James Fraser Barron, DSO, DFC, DFM: Born on 9th January 1921 in Dunedin, New Zealand, James Fraser Barron commenced training in the RNZAF on 2nd July 1940. Following his qualification as a Sergeant pilot, he arrived in the UK and was selected for bomber training and after leaving No.20 Operational Training Unit at RAF Lossiemouth - where Barron and his crew survived a ditching in a Wellington- they were posted to Short Stirling equipped No.15 Squadron at RAF Wyton, completing his first tour. Posted to No.1651 Conversion Unit, Waterbeach as an instructor he was commissioned as Pilot Officer in March 1942 and in May 1942 was awarded the DFM for his service with No.15 squadron. During this period he managed to take part in further sorties including the One Thousand Bomber Raids against Cologne, Essen and Bremen. In September 1942, Barron joined No.7 squadron, flying 16 sorties on this tour - during which he was promoted to Flight Lieutenant, followed in December 1942 by the award of his Path Finder Force badge. At the end of his tour in February 1943, he was awarded the DFC and a fortnight later his first DSO. He was then posted to No.11 OTU, Wescott. Tiring of the training environment, Fraser Barron eventually persuaded Hamish Mahaddie (at one time his flight commander) to approve his return to operations - an approval regretted by Hamish. Fraser rejoined the now Lancaster equipped No.7 Squadron in December 1943, which was for Bomber Command a period of heavy losses. Fraser took part in several sorties including on the night of 19th/20th February 1944, the Leipzig raid - during which the RAF lost 78 bombers. He was promoted to Wing Commander in February 1944 and on 28th April was appointed C.O. of No.7 Squadron. Fraser and his crew were now often used as Master Bomber to control bomber attacks and for one such attack on Nantes on 7th May 1944 he was awarded the bar to his DSO. On the night of 19th/20th May 1944, whilst on his third tour - his 79th sortie in all, Fraser Barron and his crew were lost during a raid against the railway marshalling yards at Le Mans. He was twenty three years old.
Item Code : AP0018Avro Lancaster Mk III ND845 MG-C. by M A Kinnear. - This EditionAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout! Buy 1 Get 1 Half Price!
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
PRINTOpen edition print.

Image size 16.5 inches x 11.5 inches (42cm x 30cm)none£14.00

Quantity:
All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling


Extra Details : Avro Lancaster Mk III ND845 MG-C. by M A Kinnear.
About all editions :

No.7 Squadron was formed 1st May 1914 at Farnborough as a Scout squadron, and went to France April 1915, equipped with the Vickers Gunbus. No.7 squadron saw service through the war with BE2c, RE5 and RE8 aircraft. The squadron pioneered the use of R/T (instead of normal W/T), using it operationally for the first time in October 1918. Disbanded at Farnborough on 31st December 1919 it reformed at Bircham Newton on 1st June 1923 equipped with Vickers Vimy bombers. These were replaced by the Vickers Virginia after moving to Worthy Down in April 1927. Between the wars No.7 squadron was equipped with various aircraft including the Handley Page Heyfords, Vickers Wellesleys and Armstrong Whitworth Whitleys and became the leading bomber squadron, winning the Laurence Minot Memorial Bombing Trophy more than any other squadron. At the outbreak of World War II, the squadron was equipped with Handley Page Hampdens, until August 1940, when it equipped with the RAFs first four engined bomber, the Short Stirling Mk I - becoming the first RAF squadron to be equipped with four engined bombers. The first raid by No.7 was 10th February 1941 on Rotterdam. The squadron settled down to a night bombing role, adding mine laying to its duties in 1942. Later with four other squadrons, it formed the nucleus of the new Pathfinder Force, its task to find and accurately mark targets with flares. In May 1943, the Stirling (which was handicapped by a low operational ceiling - it had to fly through flak rather than over it) was gradually replaced by the Avro Lancaster, which No.7 used in Peenemunde in August. From June1944 and until the end of the war, the squadron also undertook a daylight operational role in support of land forces in France and the low countries, and against V-1 and V-2 sites. No.7 squadron flew to Singapore in January 1947, and converted to Avro Lincolns, seeing action against Communist terrorists in Malay, during Operation Firedog. Returning to UK, having won the Laurence Minot Memorial Bombing Trophy outright for the eighth time it was disbanded 1st January 1956. Reforming in November of the same year with the Vickers Valiant V bomber. Disbanded on 30th September 1962, it was reformed in May 1970 at RAF St. Mawgan on target provision duties. Equipped with the English Electric Canberra, the squadron provided targets for the Army and Navy anti aircraft guns. They also provided silent targets for radar station practice. On 12th December 1981 the squadron was again disbanded, reforming soon after as the second operational Boeing Vertol Chinook helicopter Squadron on 2nd September 1982.

Some other related items available from this site, matching the aircraft, squadron or signatures of this item.

 On the night of 7th-8th June 1944, a Lancaster of No.207 Sqn piloted by Wing Commander John Grey was part of a force of 112 bombers and 10 Mosquitoes sent to attack a tank storage park near Cerisy-la-Foret. With the D-Day landings just 48 hours old, it was considered too risky to leave the tank park intact, should the Germans try to launch a counter thrust from this position, just 20 miles from the French coast near Bayeux.  Shortly after crossing the coast, Greys aircraft was attacked by a JU.88 and both the mid upper gunner Sutherland and tail gunner McIntosh opened fire on their pursuer and sent it down in flames. No sooner had they recovered from this fright when a second JU.88 closed in on them. Again, both gunners combined their fire and destroyed the enemy aircraft in mid air.  Grey pressed on to the target where their bombs fell on the enemy tank depot, also destroying some fuel dumps and an important road junction.  Returning to the French coast to begin their journey home, they were attacked yet again, this time by a Messerschmitt  Bf 110. With machine-like precision, McIntosh and Sutherland opened fire together, claiming their third victim in a single night. For this extraordinary feat, both gunners were awarded the DFC.

Gunners Moon by Ivan Berryman.
£35.00
 On the night of 12th September 1944, Lancaster NF958 (LS-M) of No.15 Sqn was lost in the skies above Mannheim when it was attacked by the Messerschmitt Bf.110G-2 of Ofw Ludwig Schmidt of II/NGJ 6, the bomber receiving hits to the bomb bay which ignited the incendiaries still in their racks.  Five of the crew bailed out and were taken prisoner of war once captured.  The pilot, F/O Norman Overend RNZAF, did not escape the aircraft.  Flt Sgt Harry A Beverton was seen to leave the stricken Lancaster but was not seen again.<br><br><b>Crew of <i>Lancaster LS-M</i> :</b><br><br>F/O Norman Overend RNZAF<br>Sgt Barry J Howarth <i>(survived)</i><br>Sgt George B Thomson <i>(survived)</i><br>Flt Sgt John D Jones <i>(survived)</i><br>Flt Sgt Robert P E Kendall <i>(survived)</i><br>Flt Sgt Harry A Beverton<br>Sgt I Spagatner <i>(survived)</i>.

Incident over Mannheim by Ivan Berryman. (C)
£400.00
 In the history of air warfare few missions come close in terms of courage and the highest skills of precision flying to the one carried out by 617 Squadron on the night of 16th-17th May 1943.  Codenamed Operation Chastise, their mission was to destroy the great dams that were vital to the industries of the Ruhr and, to do so, they would use a radical new weapon designed by Barnes Wallis - a <i>bouncing bomb</i> that would <i>skip</i> across the water before detonating against the dam wall.  On the night of 16th May, after seven weeks of intensive low level training, nineteen crews flew their Lancaster bombers from RAF Scampton to carry out what became one of the most legendary missions of all time.  The result was the destruction of the Möhne and Eder dams.  Robert Taylor's outstanding painting depicts a moment at the height of the successful attack on the Möhne Dam, the first of three primary targets that night, as 'Dinghy' Young powers Lancaster AJ-A over the wall of the dam just after releasing his bouncing bomb.  Commanding Officer Guy Gibson, flying high with lights on to draw enemy flak, noted that Young's bomb made 'three good bounces' before successfully detonating against the dam wall to trigger its collapse.  David Maltby in AJ-J will shortly deliver the final, decisive blow.
The Dambusters - Three Good Bounces by Robert Taylor. (RM)
£825.00
 During the years of the German occupation of Holland in World War II, more than 20,000 Dutch civilians perished through starvation and lack of basic provisions. Operation Manna was set in motion on Sunday, 29th April 1945 when Lancasters of the Royal Air Force began the first of 2,835 sorties, dropping 6,672 tons of food, to relieve the crisis in the Netherlands.  These humanitarian missions continued until 8th May, saving many thousands of civilians from certain death by starvation and malnutrition.  Here, Lancaster 4K765, LS-Z of 15 Sqn piloted by Flying Officer Jack Darlow, releases its precious cargo over a sports field north of The Hague.  Also in the crew was Alistair Lamb the Rear Gunner.

Operation Manna by Ivan Berryman. (APB)
£200.00

The Aircraft :
NameInfo
LancasterThe Avro Lancaster arose from the avro Manchester and the first prototype Lancaster was a converted Manchester with four engines. The Lancaster was first flown in January 1941, and started operations in March 1942. By March 1945 The Royal Air Force had 56 squadrons of Lancasters with the first squadron equipped being No.44 Squadron. During World War Two the Avro Lancaster flew 156,000 sorties and dropped 618,378 tonnes of bombs between 1942 and 1945. Lancaster Bomberss took part in the devastating round-the-clock raids on Hamburg during Air Marshall Harris' "Operation Gomorrah" in July 1943. Just 35 Lancasters completed more than 100 successful operations each, and 3,249 were lost in action. The most successful survivor completed 139 operations, and the Lancaster was scrapped after the war in 1947. A few Lancasters were converted into tankers and the two tanker aircraft were joined by another converted Lancaster and were used in the Berlin Airlift, achieving 757 tanker sorties. A famous Lancaster bombing raid was the 1943 mission, codenamed Operation Chastise, to destroy the dams of the Ruhr Valley. The operation was carried out by 617 Squadron in modified Mk IIIs carrying special drum shaped bouncing bombs designed by Barnes Wallis. Also famous was a series of Lancaster attacks using Tallboy bombs against the German battleship Tirpitz, which first disabled and later sank the ship. The Lancaster bomber was the basis of the new Avro Lincoln bomber, initially known as the Lancaster IV and Lancaster V. (Becoming Lincoln B1 and B2 respectively.) Their Lancastrian airliner was also based on the Lancaster but was not very successful. Other developments were the Avro York and the successful Shackleton which continued in airborne early warning service up to 1992.

See our aviation history timeline for all today's historical aviation events - air victories, aircraft losses and pilot details.

RECENT UPDATES TO OUR AVIATION HISTORY DATABASES
Updates made to Airframes database for : Flying Fortress 42-5907 : Squadrons updated (added 388th Bomb Group)
Sergeant Hugh Murray added to aircrew database :
Killed aged 25 on 4th July 1943 when his Stirling BK718 WP-M of No.90 Sqn was shot down and crashed near Cologne. He is buried in Overloon War Cemetery. Son of Hugh and Alice Murray; husband of Frances MacMillan Murray.
D. N. Beal added to aircrew database.
New victory claim added : Do17 claimed on 15th September 1940 by Robert Innes of No.253 Sqn RAF
Updates made to Aircrew database for : Pilot Officer Oliver Bertram Morrogh-Ryan : First name updated (now Oliver Bertram), Deceased updated, Aircraft updated, Squadrons updated (added No.68 Sqn RAF), Airframes updated, Squadron service dates updated, Rank updated (now Pilot Officer)
Updates made to Aircrew database for : Flight Lieutenant Roy Pengilley : Squadrons updated (added No.582 Sqn RAF), Squadron service dates updated
Updates made to Airframes database for : Whitley P4974 : Airframe notes updated (added 11-02-1941 : Whitley was ordered to divert course but misunderstood order and subsequently ran out of fuel, successfully abandoned. )
Updates made to Aircrew database for : W. A. Fullerton : Squadrons updated (added No.58 Sqn RAF), Squadron service dates updated
Updates made to Airframes database for : Wellington T2702 : Airframe notes updated (added 10-02-1941 : Wellington was last heard confirming its task had been completed. It was shot down by a night-fighter and crashed west of Kampen in Holland. The remains of one of the crew, Sergeant Reardon weren't found until 1967 and was buried.)
New victory claim added : He111 claimed on 26th September 1940 by Jozef Jeka of No.238 Sqn RAF
SEARCH OUR AVIATION HISTORY DATABASES

 

AVIATION PRINTS

Click above to see all of our half price aviation prints - Eight random items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Offers

 A swordfish from HMS Warspite on patrol off the coast of Egypt, near the port of Alexandria.

Out of Alex by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £35.00
 As dawn breaks across South Pacific skies, a group of Mitsubishi A6M5 Zeros of the 201st Air Group head outbound from their base at Rabaul on a raiding sortie in November 1944.

Zero Hour by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £40.00
The last purely British fighter aircraft to be used by the Royal Air Force, the Lightning offered a truly massive performance advantage over existing equipment when it was introduced into squadron service in 1960, achieving level flight speed of around, 1400mph. The prototype known as the P1 had flown in 1954 but production aircraft were not available until 1959, a long gestation period but perhaps understandable with such an advanced machine with many untried, new features. The painting shows an F1A of 111 squadron taking off from its base at Wattisham. The remarque drawing shows an aircraft of 56 squadron Firebirds in 1963 when they were the official RAF aerobatics team for that year. 337 Lightnings were produced, serving with nine squadrons of the Royal Air Force before being supersede by the Phantom and Tornado.
BAC Lightning by Keith Woodcock.
Half Price! - £20.00
 Shown in the colours of Jasta Boelke and carrying Baumers personal red / white /  black flash on the fuselage, Fokker DR.1 204/17 was the aircraft in which he scored many of his 43 victories. Although the Sopwith Triplane had been withdrawn from service, German pilots frequently found their DR.1s being mistakenly attacked by their own flak batteries and, sometimes, by other pilots. For this reason, in march 1918, Baumers aircraft bore additional crosses on the centre of the tailplane and on the lower wings to aid identification. For some reason, his rudder displayed what appeared to be an incomplete border to the national marking. Nicknamed Der Eiserne Adler – The Iron Eagle – Paul Baumer survived the war, but died in a flying accident near Copenhagen whilst testing the Rohrbach Rofix fighter.  He is shown in action having just downed an RE.8 while, above him, Leutnant Otto Lofflers DR.1 190/17 banks into the sun to begin another attack.

Leutnant Paul Baumer by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £40.00

 Harrier GR3s of No. 1 squadron in a secluded hide following a field exercise. The unique vertical take off capabilities of the Harrier allow front-line squadrons to deploy from dispersed sites.

GR3 Field Trip by Stuart Brown. (Y)
Half Price! - £60.00
 En route to the dams of the Ruhr Valley, the first wave of three specially adapted Avro Lancasters roar across the Dutch wetlands on the night of 16 -17th May 1943 led by Wing Commander Guy Gibson, their mission to breach the Mohne and Eder dams, thus robbing the German war machine of valuable hydro-electric power and disrupting the water supply to the entire area.  Carrying their unique, Barnes Wallis designed 'Bouncing Bomb' and flying at just 30m above the ground to avoid radar detection, 617 Squadron's Lancasters forged their way into the enemy territories, following the canals of the Netherlands and flying through forest fire traps below treetop height to their targets.  Gibson's aircraft ('G'-George) is nearest with 'M'-Mother of Fl/Lt Hopgood off his port wing and 'P'-Peter (Popsie) of Fl/Lt Martin in the distance.

Dambusters - The First Wave by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £70.00
 easyJet is one of the largest operators of the Airbus A319 with some 142 of the type on its strength.  G-EZAM is depicted beginning its final approach.

easyJet Airbus A319 by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £700.00
Reformed in November 2000, 99 Squadron, based at Brize Norton, is now the operator of the RAF's new heavy transport, the Boeing C-17 Globemaster III, an example of which is shown on the newly extended concrete runway at Camp Bastion in Helmand Province, Afghanistan.  The C-17s have become the mainstay of the RAF's supply train, shuttling between the UK and Afghanistan, as well as providing specialist aeromedical evacuation and humanitarian relief duties.

Globemaster III by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £800.00

 

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