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We have without doubt the largest collection of aviation paintings and prints with over 400,000 prints in stock ready for immediate shipping.  We provide thousands of aviation art prints.  We have over the years not only published a huge range of art prints but purchased over the entire back catalogues of leading aviation artists Nicolas Trudgian, Gerald Coulson and Robert Tomlin which means you won't find most of our aviation art anywhere else.  We offer more types of aircraft flown by many countries.  Our easily accessible website displays each of these sections down into individual pages for aviation art of each aircraft, squadron, conflict and pilot.  Also on the site we feature a directory of aviation artists, which includes Robert Taylor, Ivan Berryman, Nicolas Trudgian, Gerald Coulson, David Pentland, Anthony Saunders and many other aviation artists.  Most of our collections are only available direct from us.  We dispatch to all countries around the world. with our unbeatable service to the United States and Canada making us the No.1 aviation art provider.


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Avro Lancaster Mk III ND845 MG-C. by M A Kinnear.


Avro Lancaster Mk III ND845 MG-C. by M A Kinnear.

Aircraft History: ND845 was one of 600 Mk III Lancasters delivered to the RAF from December 1943 to May 1944 by A V Roe (Chadderton) Delivered to No.7 Squadron, it was lost on the night of 19th/20th May 1944, whilst acting as Master Bomber on a raid against the railway marshalling yards at Le Mans. It is believed it was in collision with another No.7 Squadron Lancaster JB653 (MG - R) piloted by Squadron Leader J M Dennis - the Deputy Master Bomber. There were no survivors from either crew.

Wing Commander James Fraser Barron, DSO, DFC, DFM: Born on 9th January 1921 in Dunedin, New Zealand, James Fraser Barron commenced training in the RNZAF on 2nd July 1940. Following his qualification as a Sergeant pilot, he arrived in the UK and was selected for bomber training and after leaving No.20 Operational Training Unit at RAF Lossiemouth - where Barron and his crew survived a ditching in a Wellington- they were posted to Short Stirling equipped No.15 Squadron at RAF Wyton, completing his first tour. Posted to No.1651 Conversion Unit, Waterbeach as an instructor he was commissioned as Pilot Officer in March 1942 and in May 1942 was awarded the DFM for his service with No.15 squadron. During this period he managed to take part in further sorties including the One Thousand Bomber Raids against Cologne, Essen and Bremen. In September 1942, Barron joined No.7 squadron, flying 16 sorties on this tour - during which he was promoted to Flight Lieutenant, followed in December 1942 by the award of his Path Finder Force badge. At the end of his tour in February 1943, he was awarded the DFC and a fortnight later his first DSO. He was then posted to No.11 OTU, Wescott. Tiring of the training environment, Fraser Barron eventually persuaded Hamish Mahaddie (at one time his flight commander) to approve his return to operations - an approval regretted by Hamish. Fraser rejoined the now Lancaster equipped No.7 Squadron in December 1943, which was for Bomber Command a period of heavy losses. Fraser took part in several sorties including on the night of 19th/20th February 1944, the Leipzig raid - during which the RAF lost 78 bombers. He was promoted to Wing Commander in February 1944 and on 28th April was appointed C.O. of No.7 Squadron. Fraser and his crew were now often used as Master Bomber to control bomber attacks and for one such attack on Nantes on 7th May 1944 he was awarded the bar to his DSO. On the night of 19th/20th May 1944, whilst on his third tour - his 79th sortie in all, Fraser Barron and his crew were lost during a raid against the railway marshalling yards at Le Mans. He was twenty three years old.
Item Code : AP0018Avro Lancaster Mk III ND845 MG-C. by M A Kinnear. - This EditionAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout! Buy 1 Get 1 Half Price!
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
PRINTOpen edition print.

Image size 16.5 inches x 11.5 inches (42cm x 30cm)none£14.00

Quantity:
All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling


Extra Details : Avro Lancaster Mk III ND845 MG-C. by M A Kinnear.
About all editions :

No.7 Squadron was formed 1st May 1914 at Farnborough as a Scout squadron, and went to France April 1915, equipped with the Vickers Gunbus. No.7 squadron saw service through the war with BE2c, RE5 and RE8 aircraft. The squadron pioneered the use of R/T (instead of normal W/T), using it operationally for the first time in October 1918. Disbanded at Farnborough on 31st December 1919 it reformed at Bircham Newton on 1st June 1923 equipped with Vickers Vimy bombers. These were replaced by the Vickers Virginia after moving to Worthy Down in April 1927. Between the wars No.7 squadron was equipped with various aircraft including the Handley Page Heyfords, Vickers Wellesleys and Armstrong Whitworth Whitleys and became the leading bomber squadron, winning the Laurence Minot Memorial Bombing Trophy more than any other squadron. At the outbreak of World War II, the squadron was equipped with Handley Page Hampdens, until August 1940, when it equipped with the RAFs first four engined bomber, the Short Stirling Mk I - becoming the first RAF squadron to be equipped with four engined bombers. The first raid by No.7 was 10th February 1941 on Rotterdam. The squadron settled down to a night bombing role, adding mine laying to its duties in 1942. Later with four other squadrons, it formed the nucleus of the new Pathfinder Force, its task to find and accurately mark targets with flares. In May 1943, the Stirling (which was handicapped by a low operational ceiling - it had to fly through flak rather than over it) was gradually replaced by the Avro Lancaster, which No.7 used in Peenemunde in August. From June1944 and until the end of the war, the squadron also undertook a daylight operational role in support of land forces in France and the low countries, and against V-1 and V-2 sites. No.7 squadron flew to Singapore in January 1947, and converted to Avro Lincolns, seeing action against Communist terrorists in Malay, during Operation Firedog. Returning to UK, having won the Laurence Minot Memorial Bombing Trophy outright for the eighth time it was disbanded 1st January 1956. Reforming in November of the same year with the Vickers Valiant V bomber. Disbanded on 30th September 1962, it was reformed in May 1970 at RAF St. Mawgan on target provision duties. Equipped with the English Electric Canberra, the squadron provided targets for the Army and Navy anti aircraft guns. They also provided silent targets for radar station practice. On 12th December 1981 the squadron was again disbanded, reforming soon after as the second operational Boeing Vertol Chinook helicopter Squadron on 2nd September 1982.

Some other related items available from this site, matching the aircraft, squadron or signatures of this item.

 When No 49 Squadron Lancasters bombed the S.S. barracks at Berchtesgaden on 25th April 1945, its aircrews completed a campaign that had begun 5 and a half years earlier in September, 1939. From the very beginning, 49 Squadron were in the thick of the action with one of their pilots, Roderick Learoyd, winning Bomber Commands first Victoria Cross. In 1942 it was Lancasters of 49 Squadron that led the epic raid on Schneider armament and locomotive works at Le Creusot. In 1943 they flew the shuttle-bombing raids to Friedrichshafen and Spezia, attacked the heavily defended rocket sites at Peenemunde, and in preparation for D-Day, bombarded the coastal batteries in Normandy and the V-1 sites in the caves by the river Loire, north of Paris. Later in 1944 the squadron notably took part in the raid on German Baltic Fleet, continuing to fly important bombing missions against the Nazi war machine until the final collapse of the Third Reich. So it was fitting that an RAF squadron whose history went right back to 1916, should make the coupe de grace at Berchtesgarden.  Northern Europes short summer nights, with darkness lasting but a few hours, often saw the RAF bomber crews returning to England at dawn, and it is one such scene which is caught up over the river Orwell at Pin Mill, Lancasters of No. 49 Squadron descend low over Suffolk, heading towards their base at Fiskerton. The night raid on Hamburg is almost completed. Spitfires from No. 129 Squadron, based at Hornchurch, having made an early morning attack on German installations in Holland, have picked up the bombers and escorted them home.
Home at Dawn by Nicolas Trudgian. (B)
£255.00
 The Lancaster B MkIII of Flt Lt J V Hopgood was the second aircraft to make an attempt at breaching the Mohne Dam on the night of 16/17th of May 1943, ED925(G) (AJ-M) encountering intense flak and 20mm fire from the shore and from the towers of the dam itself. Just moments from the release of the Upkeep bomb, both of Hopgood's port engines took direct hits and burst into flames as other rounds ripped through the starboard wing. Despite these fatal strikes, the brave crew pressed home their attack, but released their bomb just seconds too late to be effective. The bomb bounced over the dam wall, landing on the power station below where it exploded with devastating results. With blazing fuel now engulfing the wing of his crippled aircraft, Hopgood climbed to about 500ft where the wing failed, sending ED925 into a dive from which it would never recover. By jumping clear just moments before impact, two of her crew survived to become prisoners of war.

Determined to the Last by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
£200.00
 On the night of 16/17th May 1943,under a full moon, 19 specially modified Lancaster bombers from 617 Squadron carried out one of the most daring and effective air raids of the Second World War. Led by wing commander Guy Gibson the 19 aircraft took off and headed for Germany at extreme low level.. Their mission, code named Operation Chastise, was to destroy the Ruhr dams which supplied water and electricity to the industrial heart of Reich. Each aircraft carried the ingenious Upkeep mine, developed by the engineer Barnes Wallis. Shaped like a large oil drum, the bomb was spun prior to release at exactly 60ft above the water and 150 yards from the dam wall. This caused the weapon to bounce across water and on impact would also make it stay close to the wall of the dam as it sank. The bomb, technically a mine, was fitted with a hydrostatic fuse similar to a depth charge causing detonation at the required depth.The correct height above the water was achieved by aligning the beams of two spotlights to meet on the surface of the water. Delivering such a weapon on target at night at such low altitude and under enemy fire was thought by many to be impossible.  The nineteen pilots,some as young as eighteen had been hand picked by Gibson only two months before and formed into 617 squadron whose first mission was to remain top secret and unknown to them up until the last moment. The Mohne Dam was attacked first and several attempts were made under heavy fire with one lancaster being shot down as it flew over the target.Guy Gibson then attempted to draw fire away from the attacking aircraft by switching on his navigation lights and flying to one side of Mick Martins aircraft ,the scene depicted in Simon Smiths painting.Just as another aircraft was about to go in,excited shouts came over the intercom - its gone! The main target achieved, Gibson led the remaining aircraft on to the Eder Dam deep amongst the mountains of the Eder valley. Here, although no flak defenses, the terrain made the approach extremely hazardous. Two bombs were released yet still the target remained unbreached leaving only one last aircraft ,that of Les Knights to attack. A steep descent from a thousand feet then a dive over a spit of land left very little time to line up and release the bomb.Worse still there was a huge mountain on the far side of the dam! Added to this Edward Johnson the bomb aimer recalled that the spinning bomb had an alarming gyroscopic effect on the handling of the aircraft,so it was with superb flying and teamwork that their bomb struck and finally destroyed the massive stonework of the Eder Dam. Gibsons leadership and bravery led to the award of the VC and many other decorations were bestowed upon the other crews.The squadron however paid a heavy price with 8 lancasters being lost.

The Dambusters by Simon Smith.
£125.00
 A Lancaster of No.15 Squadron takes to the air at the start of a night sortie from Mildenhall in June 1944.

Last One Away by Ivan Berryman. (P)
£900.00

The Aircraft :
NameInfo
LancasterThe Avro Lancaster arose from the avro Manchester and the first prototype Lancaster was a converted Manchester with four engines. The Lancaster was first flown in January 1941, and started operations in March 1942. By March 1945 The Royal Air Force had 56 squadrons of Lancasters with the first squadron equipped being No.44 Squadron. During World War Two the Avro Lancaster flew 156,000 sorties and dropped 618,378 tonnes of bombs between 1942 and 1945. Lancaster Bomberss took part in the devastating round-the-clock raids on Hamburg during Air Marshall Harris' "Operation Gomorrah" in July 1943. Just 35 Lancasters completed more than 100 successful operations each, and 3,249 were lost in action. The most successful survivor completed 139 operations, and the Lancaster was scrapped after the war in 1947. A few Lancasters were converted into tankers and the two tanker aircraft were joined by another converted Lancaster and were used in the Berlin Airlift, achieving 757 tanker sorties. A famous Lancaster bombing raid was the 1943 mission, codenamed Operation Chastise, to destroy the dams of the Ruhr Valley. The operation was carried out by 617 Squadron in modified Mk IIIs carrying special drum shaped bouncing bombs designed by Barnes Wallis. Also famous was a series of Lancaster attacks using Tallboy bombs against the German battleship Tirpitz, which first disabled and later sank the ship. The Lancaster bomber was the basis of the new Avro Lincoln bomber, initially known as the Lancaster IV and Lancaster V. (Becoming Lincoln B1 and B2 respectively.) Their Lancastrian airliner was also based on the Lancaster but was not very successful. Other developments were the Avro York and the successful Shackleton which continued in airborne early warning service up to 1992.

See our aviation history timeline for all today's historical aviation events - air victories, aircraft losses and pilot details.

RECENT UPDATES TO OUR AVIATION HISTORY DATABASES
Updates made to Aircrew database for : Pilot Officer Robinson :
Flight Lieutenant Robert Charles Platt added to aircrew database :
Killed aged 29 on 4th July 1943 when his Stirling BK718 WP-M of No.90 Sqn was shot down and crashed near Cologne. He is buried in Overloon War Cemetery. Son of James Francis and Amelia Louisa Minnie Platt, of Teddington, Middlesex.
D. N. Beal added to aircrew database.
New victory claim added : He111 claimed on 26th September 1940 by Jozef Jeka of No.238 Sqn RAF
New victory claim added : Me109 (Probable victory) claimed on 2nd June 1940 by James Baird Coward of No.19 Sqn RAF
Updates made to Airframes database for : Wellington W5365 : Airframe notes updated (added 08-02-1941 : Wellington stalled and crashed while trying to land at Tollerton, it came down near Cotgrave. )
Whitley Mk.V T4213 of No.58 Sqn RAF added to the airframes database.
Updates made to Airframes database for : Flying Fortress 42-5906 : Squadrons updated (added 388th Bomb Group)
EJG1 added to the squadrons database.
Flying Fortress Mk.F-85-BO 42-30046 of 546th Bomb Squadron added to the airframes database.
SEARCH OUR AVIATION HISTORY DATABASES

 

AVIATION PRINTS

Click above to see all of our half price aviation prints - Eight random items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Offers

Hawker Hurricanes of 249 squadron (RAF) departing off HMS Ark Royal in June 1941 as par tof Force H. The Hurricanes were to become part of the Defence of Malta against the onslought and non stop bombing by the Axis Bombers and HMS Ark Royal would be sunk only a few months later when on the 13th November 1941 HMS Ark Royal was hit by a single torpedo from the German U-boat U81. The torpedo hit  on the starboard side near the starboard boiler room causing a 130ft by 30ft hole. Water poured in causing a 10% list immediately. The flooding spread quickly to the middle of the ship and then to the port boiler room, eectric power failed,  and after 14 hours while in tow to Gibraltar she capsized and sunk the following day.

Malta Relief by Tim Fisher.
Half Price! - £20.00
The scene depicts an encounter between Manfred Von Richthoffen, leader of the Jasta II squadron and a patrol of Sopwith Camels. This particular battle above France took place only weeks before Richthoffen was killed as can be seen from the Balken Kreuz insignia which replaced the iron cross on German aircraft after a directive dated March 1918.

Manfred Von Richthoffen (The Red Baron) by Tim Fisher.
Half Price! - £20.00
After take off a Sunderland of Coastal Command flies low over its base at Rosneath on the Gareloch, as Royal Navy battleships lay at anchor around the naval base of Faslane, near Helensburgh, Scotland during 1945.

Sunderland Over the Gareloch by Geoff Lea (P)
Half Price! - £1200.00
 Regarded by some in the Air Ministry as a failed fighter, the mighty Hawker Typhoon was unrivalled as a ground attack aircraft, especially in the crucial months immediately prior to – and after – D-Day when squadrons of Typhoons operated in 'cab ranks' to smash the German infrastructure and smooth the passage of the invading allied force.  This aircraft is Mk.1B (MN570) of Wing Commander R E P Brooker of 123 Wing based at Thorney Island.

Sledgehammer by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £75.00

 A pair of Spitfire Mk.IXs of 402 Squadron Royal Canadian Air Force, based at Kenley, practise combat manoeuvres in the skies above Kent in May, 1943.

Spitfire Alley by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £75.00
 Westland Wessex of No.72 Squadron based at RAF Aldergrove, flying over the Copeland Islands in Belfast Lough.

Wessex Over the Copelands by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £35.00
 Almost every major invasion that took place in Europe in World War II began with para drops, and in almost every case the C-47 was the aircraft that delivered these elite fighting troops. Few C-47 pilots had more combat experience than Sid Harwell, seen flying his Dakota in this typical action scene, dropping airborne troops into occupied Europe soon after D-Day. No matter what resistance he encountered, the good C-47 pilot put his aircraft right over the Dropping Zone, every time.
Invasion Force by Nicolas Trudgian. (Y)
Half Price! - £40.00
 The Royal Air Force is currently the largest operator of the Boeing Chinook after the United States, this ubiquitous helicopter now equipping  No.s 7, 18 and 27 Sqn based at RAF Odiham.  Deployed in Afghanistan, the flight and ground crew operate jointly as the Expeditionary Chinook Engineering Squadron (ExCES), No.1310 Flight.  Here, a Chinook is depicted ferrying an underslung re-supply load out of Camp Bastion in Helmand Province, Afghanistan.

A Vital Role by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £800.00

 

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