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Fighting Falcons by Keith Aspinall - AviationArtPrints.com

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Fighting Falcons by Keith Aspinall


Fighting Falcons by Keith Aspinall

F16Cs of the 52nd Fighter Wing and the 31st Fighter Wing in action over the Balkans.
Item Code : KA0003Fighting Falcons by Keith Aspinall - This EditionAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout! Buy 1 Get 1 Half Price!
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PRINTOpen edition print.

Image size 14.5 inches x 9.5 inches (37cm x 24cm)none20.00

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Some other related items available from this site, matching the aircraft, squadron or signatures of this item.

Pilots from the 31st and the 52nd Fighter Wings climb their heavily armed F-16 Vipers out of Aviano Air Base, Italy, on a strike mission over Bosnia, June 1999.
Viper Venom by Robert Taylor.
200.00
 Aerial refueling revolutionized aerial warfare. The first such documented refueling took place in June of 1923 when a specially modified DH-4B piloted by Lts. Virgil Hine and Frank Seifert took off from Rockwell Field in San Diego and managed to refuel another DH-4 piloted by Capt. Lowell Smith. The success of this aerial refueling permitted an attempt at a world record of flight duration. Taking off again from Rockwell Field Smith kept his aircraft airborne for more than 33 hours. Aerial refueling remained a novelty until many decades later when the jet age arrived. Modern jet-powered fighters are awesome machines, but they can consume enormous amounts of fuel, especially when flying at maximum speeds or climbing under maximum power. A jet taking off with a full weapons load that climbs to 60,000 feet under full power may consume more than half its fuel capacity. Aerial refueling was necessary to make jet powered fighters and bombers a practical weapon. In the 1950s the Air Force developed a flying boom method of refueling whereas the Navy utilized a probe and drogue system. The former required a specially trained boom operator but can pass fuel very quickly. The Navy system could handle multiple aircraft at the same time, but required a higher standard of flying. Both in Vietnam and later during the Gulf War, aerial refueling proved invaluable to the success of the air campaigns. In Stan Stokes painting, F-16 Falcons approach their tanker for refueling. The F-16 Fighting Falcon, designed by Harry Hillaker, first rolled out of the General Dynamics assembly line in Ft. Worth Texas in October of 1976. The aircraft was originally built as a technology demonstration exercise to show how much weight and cost could be eliminated from the F-15 Strike Eagle. In 1975, at the Paris Air Show, the F-16 prototype with test pilot Neal Anderson at the controls competed in the Great Fighter Competition. To the winner; billions of potential sales to countries like Belgium, Denmark, the Netherlands, and Norway. The F-16 duked it out against the French-built Mirage F1-E and the Swedish Saab 37 Viggen. The F-16 was the winner.  Interest in a new lightweight, cost-effective, fighter-interceptor evolved in the mid-1970s as a replacement for the aging F-104. The F-16s outward appearance has remained the same for twenty-five years while remarkable advances in technology have been incorporated into the aircrafts internals. Improved engines, enhanced radar and avionics, and superior missiles have kept the F-16 effective. The F-16 can carry nearly ten tons of armament on its external stores stations. This range of armament includes air-to-air missiles, air-to-ground missiles, intelligent and traditional bombs, 6000 round per minute Vulcan guns, and external fuel tanks.
Thirsty Falcons by Stan Stokes. (GS)
294.00
 Aerial refueling revolutionized aerial warfare. The first such documented refueling took place in June of 1923 when a specially modified DH-4B piloted by Lts. Virgil Hine and Frank Seifert took off from Rockwell Field in San Diego and managed to refuel another DH-4 piloted by Capt. Lowell Smith. The success of this aerial refueling permitted an attempt at a world record of flight duration. Taking off again from Rockwell Field Smith kept his aircraft airborne for more than 33 hours. Aerial refueling remained a novelty until many decades later when the jet age arrived. Modern jet-powered fighters are awesome machines, but they can consume enormous amounts of fuel, especially when flying at maximum speeds or climbing under maximum power. A jet taking off with a full weapons load that climbs to 60,000 feet under full power may consume more than half its fuel capacity. Aerial refueling was necessary to make jet powered fighters and bombers a practical weapon. In the 1950s the Air Force developed a flying boom method of refueling whereas the Navy utilized a probe and drogue system. The former required a specially trained boom operator but can pass fuel very quickly. The Navy system could handle multiple aircraft at the same time, but required a higher standard of flying. Both in Vietnam and later during the Gulf War, aerial refueling proved invaluable to the success of the air campaigns. In Stan Stokes painting, F-16 Falcons approach their tanker for refueling. The F-16 Fighting Falcon, designed by Harry Hillaker, first rolled out of the General Dynamics assembly line in Ft. Worth Texas in October of 1976. The aircraft was originally built as a technology demonstration exercise to show how much weight and cost could be eliminated from the F-15 Strike Eagle. In 1975, at the Paris Air Show, the F-16 prototype with test pilot Neal Anderson at the controls competed in the Great Fighter Competition. To the winner; billions of potential sales to countries like Belgium, Denmark, the Netherlands, and Norway. The F-16 duked it out against the French-built Mirage F1-E and the Swedish Saab 37 Viggen. The F-16 was the winner.  Interest in a new lightweight, cost-effective, fighter-interceptor evolved in the mid-1970s as a replacement for the aging F-104. The F-16s outward appearance has remained the same for twenty-five years while remarkable advances in technology have been incorporated into the aircrafts internals. Improved engines, enhanced radar and avionics, and superior missiles have kept the F-16 effective. The F-16 can carry nearly ten tons of armament on its external stores stations. This range of armament includes air-to-air missiles, air-to-ground missiles, intelligent and traditional bombs, 6000 round per minute Vulcan guns, and external fuel tanks.
Thirsty Falcons by Stan Stokes. (B)
109.00
 Aerial refueling revolutionized aerial warfare. The first such documented refueling took place in June of 1923 when a specially modified DH-4B piloted by Lts. Virgil Hine and Frank Seifert took off from Rockwell Field in San Diego and managed to refuel another DH-4 piloted by Capt. Lowell Smith. The success of this aerial refueling permitted an attempt at a world record of flight duration. Taking off again from Rockwell Field Smith kept his aircraft airborne for more than 33 hours. Aerial refueling remained a novelty until many decades later when the jet age arrived. Modern jet-powered fighters are awesome machines, but they can consume enormous amounts of fuel, especially when flying at maximum speeds or climbing under maximum power. A jet taking off with a full weapons load that climbs to 60,000 feet under full power may consume more than half its fuel capacity. Aerial refueling was necessary to make jet powered fighters and bombers a practical weapon. In the 1950s the Air Force developed a flying boom method of refueling whereas the Navy utilized a probe and drogue system. The former required a specially trained boom operator but can pass fuel very quickly. The Navy system could handle multiple aircraft at the same time, but required a higher standard of flying. Both in Vietnam and later during the Gulf War, aerial refueling proved invaluable to the success of the air campaigns. In Stan Stokes painting, F-16 Falcons approach their tanker for refueling. The F-16 Fighting Falcon, designed by Harry Hillaker, first rolled out of the General Dynamics assembly line in Ft. Worth Texas in October of 1976. The aircraft was originally built as a technology demonstration exercise to show how much weight and cost could be eliminated from the F-15 Strike Eagle. In 1975, at the Paris Air Show, the F-16 prototype with test pilot Neal Anderson at the controls competed in the Great Fighter Competition. To the winner; billions of potential sales to countries like Belgium, Denmark, the Netherlands, and Norway. The F-16 duked it out against the French-built Mirage F1-E and the Swedish Saab 37 Viggen. The F-16 was the winner.  Interest in a new lightweight, cost-effective, fighter-interceptor evolved in the mid-1970s as a replacement for the aging F-104. The F-16s outward appearance has remained the same for twenty-five years while remarkable advances in technology have been incorporated into the aircrafts internals. Improved engines, enhanced radar and avionics, and superior missiles have kept the F-16 effective. The F-16 can carry nearly ten tons of armament on its external stores stations. This range of armament includes air-to-air missiles, air-to-ground missiles, intelligent and traditional bombs, 6000 round per minute Vulcan guns, and external fuel tanks.
Thirsty Falcons by Stan Stokes. (GM)
484.00

The Aircraft :
NameInfo
FalconThe F-16 is being used by the active duty USAF, Air Force Reserve, and Air National Guard units, the USAF aerial demonstration team, the U.S. Air Force Thunderbirds, and as an adversary-aggressor aircraft by the United States Navy at the Naval Strike and Air Warfare Center. The U.S. Air Force, including the Air Force Reserve and the Air National Guard, flew the F-16 in combat during Operation Desert Storm in 1991 and in the Balkans later in the 1990s. F-16s also patrolled the no-fly zones in Iraq during Operations Northern Watch and Southern Watch and served during the wars in Afghanistan (Operation Enduring Freedom) and Iraq (Operation Iraqi Freedom) from 2001 and 2003 respectively. In 2011, Air Force F-16s took part in the intervention in Libya. The F-16 had been scheduled to remain in service with the U.S. Air Force until 2025.[94] Its replacement was planned to be the F-35A variant of the Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning II, which is expected gradually begin replacing several multi-role aircraft among the program's member nations. However, due to delays in the F-35 program, all USAF F-16s will receive service life extension upgrades

See our aviation history timeline for all today's historical aviation events - air victories, aircraft losses and pilot details.

RECENT UPDATES TO OUR AVIATION HISTORY DATABASES
Updates made to Aircrew database for : Warrant Officer Stanley F Paddy Hope : First name updated (now Stanley F Paddy), Squadron service dates updated
Updates made to Aircrew database for : Flying Officer Charles Parker :
Updates made to Aircrew database for : Pilot Officer Jim Weston : Squadron service dates updated
Updates made to Airframes database for : Flying Fortress 42-30037 : Squadrons updated (added 384th Bomb Group)
Warrant Officer David Fraser added to aircrew database :
Was on his 4th Operation as a Rear Gunner with 115 Sqn on Wellingtons when he was shot down by night fighters on a raid to Hamburg on 10th May 1941. He then spent 4 years as a Prisoner of War.
Updates made to Aircrew database for : D. N. Beal : Date of death updated, Deceased updated
Updates made to Airframes database for : Hampden P4405 : Airframe notes updated (added 10-02-1941 : Hampden crashed into Bluestone plantation in Norfolk after calling for assistance.)
Updates made to Aircrew database for : Flight Lieutenant P M H S Hunt : Squadrons updated (added No.12 Sqn RAAF), Squadron service dates updated
Updates made to Aircrew database for : Warrant Officer E. Mayne : Squadron service dates updated, Rank updated (now Warrant Officer)
New victory claim added : Ju88 (Half shared victory.) claimed on 14th July 1941 by Stanislaw Brzeski of No.317 Sqn RAF
SEARCH OUR AVIATION HISTORY DATABASES

 

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