Aviation Art Prints .com Home Page
Order Helpline (UK) : 01436 820269

You currently have no items in your basket

Join us on Facebook!

Payment Options Display
Buy with confidence and security!
Publishing historical art since 1985

Follow us on Twitter!
Don't Miss Any Special Deals - Sign Up To Our Newsletter!
Aircraft
Search
Squadron
Search
Artist
Search
Signature
Search

Product Search         
Click Here For Full Artist Print Indexes Aviation History Archive
Moskito-Jager by Iain Wyllie. - AviationArtPrints.com

Massive savings on this month's big offers including our BUY ONE GET ONE HALF PRICE offer on many prints and many others at HALF PRICE or with FREE PRINTS!
Many of our offers end in 19 hours, 18 minutes!
View our Special Offers
THIS ITEM IS INCLUDED IN OUR BUY ONE GET ONE HALF PRICE OFFER !
Choose any two prints in this special offer and the lower priced item is half price. (Any free bonus prints already supplied with an item are separate and will also be included !)
Hundreds of items across our websites are included in this offer!

Moskito-Jager by Iain Wyllie.


Moskito-Jager by Iain Wyllie.

An Me262B-1a of 10/NJG.11 Kommando Welter climbs to operational altitude to begin an anti-Mosquito patrol in March 1945. The Royal Navy's best test pilot, Captain Eric Brown, chief naval test pilot and commanding officer of the Captured Enemy Aircraft Flight Royal Aircraft Establishment, who tested the Me 262 noted: This was a Blitzkrieg aircraft. You whack in at your bomber. It was never meant to be a dogfighter, it was meant to be a destroyer of bombers... The great problem with it was it did not have dive brakes. For example, if you want to fight and destroy a B-17, you come in on a dive. The 30mm cannon were not so accurate beyond 600 metres. So you normally came in at 600 yards and would open fire on your B-17. And your closing speed was still high and since you had to break away at 200 meters to avoid a collision, you only had two seconds firing time. Now, in two seconds, you can't sight. You can fire randomly and hope for the best. If you want to sight and fire, you need to double that time to four seconds. And with dive brakes, you could have done that.
Item Code : IW0005Moskito-Jager by Iain Wyllie. - This EditionAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout! Buy 1 Get 1 Half Price!
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
PRINTOpen edition print.

Image size 16.5 inches x 11.5 inches (42cm x 29cm)none£20.00

Quantity:
SAVE MONEY WITH OUR TRADE DISCOUNT DOUBLE PRINT PACKS - AVAILABLE DIRECT TO OUR CUSTOMERS AT THESE PRICES!

Buy With :
Defence of the Reich by Keith Woodcock.
for £36 -
Save £4
All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling



Other editions of this item : Moskito-Jager by Iain Wyllie. IW0005
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Knights Cross signature edition of 5 prints from the open edition.
Great value : Value of signatures exceeds price of item!
Image size 16.5 inches x 11.5 inches (42cm x 29cm) Hermann, Hajo

Signature(s) value alone : £65
£10 Off!Now : £60.00VIEW EDITION...
PRINTEric Winkle Brown signature edition of 204 prints.

Less than 20 of these specially signed prints available.
Image size 16.5 inches x 11.5 inches (42cm x 29cm) Brown, Eric Winkle

Signature(s) value alone : £45
£10 Off!Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!Now : £55.00VIEW EDITION...
Extra Details : Moskito-Jager by Iain Wyllie.
About all editions :

A photo of an edition of the print :

Some other related items available from this site, matching the aircraft, squadron or signatures of this item.

An Me262B-1a of 10/NJG.11 Kommando Welter climbs to operational altitude to begin an anti-Mosquito patrol in March 1945.  The Royal Navy's best test pilot, Captain Eric Brown, chief naval test pilot and commanding officer of the Captured Enemy Aircraft Flight Royal Aircraft Establishment, who tested the Me 262 noted: <i>This was a Blitzkrieg aircraft. You whack in at your bomber. It was never meant to be a dogfighter, it was meant to be a destroyer of bombers... The great problem with it was it did not have dive brakes. For example, if you want to fight and destroy a B-17, you come in on a dive. The 30mm cannon were not so accurate beyond 600 metres. So you normally came in at 600 yards and would open fire on your B-17. And your closing speed was still high and since you had to break away at 200 meters to avoid a collision, you only had two seconds firing time. Now, in two seconds, you can't sight. You can fire randomly and hope for the best. If you want to sight and fire, you need to double that time to four seconds. And with dive brakes, you could have done that.</i>

Moskito-Jager by Iain Wyllie. (B)
£60.00


Jet Legend by Gerald Coulson.
£30.00
 Heinz Bar joined JG 51 in 1939 as a non-officer pilot. By August of 1940 he had become the highest scoring non-officer pilot in the Luftwaffe. Although shot down once during the Battle of Britain, Bar survived, and was later transferred to the Eastern Front. He received his commission and by the end of 1941 had chalked up 91 victories. By mid-1942, with 113 victories, he was promoted to Hauptman and made Group Commander of I/JG 77. Flying out of Sicily he participated in the siege of Malta, and later was shifted to North Africa where he obtained another 61 victories. With his health suffering, Heinz was reassigned to Germany, where he flew interception missions against the steady onslaught of Eighth Air Force bombers. With his victory total at 202, Bar was put in command of JG 3 and later III/EJG2, a unit equipped with the Me-262 jet fighter. He obtained 16 victories in March and April of 1945 while piloting the 262, making him the top jet ace of WW II. His record for victories in a jet stands until this day, having been equaled in Korea by Capt. Joseph McConnell. Bars final victory count of 220 made him the eighth highest scoring ace of all time. He was killed after the War in a flying accident. The Messerschmitt Me-262 Swallow, a masterpiece of engineering, was the first operational mass-produced jet to see service. Prototype testing of the airframe commenced in 1941 utilizing a piston engine. General Adolf Galland, who was in charge of the German Fighter Forces at that time, pressured both Goring and Hitler to accelerate the Me-262, and stress its use as a fighter to defend Germany from Allied bombers. Hitler, however, envisioned the 262 as the aircraft which might allow him to inflict punishment on Britain. About 1400 Swallows were produced, but fortunately for the Allies, only about 300 saw combat duty. While the original plans for the 262 presumed the use of BMW jet engines, production Swallows were ultimately equipped with Jumo 004B turbojet engines. The wing design of the 262 necessitated the unique triangular hull section of the fuselage, giving the aircraft a shark-like appearance. With an 18 degree swept wing, the 262 was capable of Mach .86. The 262 was totally ineffective in a turning duel with Allied fighters, and was also vulnerable to attack during take off and landings. The landing gear was also suspect, and many 262s were destroyed or damaged due to landing gear failure. Despite its sleek jet-age appearance, the 262 was roughly manufactured, because Germany had lost access to its normal aircraft assembly plants. In spite of these drawbacks the 262 was effective. For example, on April 7, 1945 a force of sixty 262s took on a large force of Allied bombers with escort fighters. Armed with their four nose-mounted cannons, and underwing rockets the Swallows succeeded in downing or damaging 25 Allied B-17s on that single mission. While it is unlikely that the outcome of the War could have been altered by an earlier introduction or greater production totals for this aircraft, it is clear to many historians that the duration of the War might have been drastically lengthened if the Me-262 had not been too little too late.

Too Little Too Late by Stan Stokes.
£27.00
 Adolf Galland fought in the great Battles of Poland, France and Britain, leading the famous JG26 Abbeville Boys. He flew in combat against the RAFs best including Douglas Bader, Bob Stanford Tuck and Johnnie Johnson. In 1941, at the age of 29, he was promoted to Inspector of the Fighter Arm. In 1942 Hitler personally selected Galland to organise the fighter escort for the Channel Dash mission. He became the youngest General in the German High Command but open disagreements with Hermann Goering led to his dismissal at the end of 1944. He reverted to combat flying, forming the famous JV44 wing flying the Me262 jet fighter, and was the only General in history to lead a squadron into battle. With 104 victories, all in the West, Adolf Galland received the Knights Cross with Oak Leaves, Swords and Diamonds.

Adolf Galland by Graeme Lothian. (APC)
£170.00

The Aircraft :
NameInfo
Me262The Messerschmitt Me-262 Swallow, a masterpiece of engineering, was the first operational mass-produced jet to see service. Prototype testing of the airframe commenced in 1941 utilizing a piston engine. General Adolf Galland, who was in charge of the German Fighter Forces at that time, pressured both Goring and Hitler to accelerate the Me-262, and stress its use as a fighter to defend Germany from Allied bombers. Hitler, however, envisioned the 262 as the aircraft which might allow him to inflict punishment on Britain. About 1400 Swallows were produced, but fortunately for the Allies, only about 300 saw combat duty. While the original plans for the 262 presumed the use of BMW jet engines, production Swallows were ultimately equipped with Jumo 004B turbojet engines. The wing design of the 262 necessitated the unique triangular hull section of the fuselage, giving the aircraft a shark-like appearance. With an 18 degree swept wing, the 262 was capable of Mach .86. The 262 was totally ineffective in a turning duel with Allied fighters, and was also vulnerable to attack during take off and landings. The landing gear was also suspect, and many 262s were destroyed or damaged due to landing gear failure. Despite its sleek jet-age appearance, the 262 was roughly manufactured, because Germany had lost access to its normal aircraft assembly plants. In spite of these drawbacks the 262 was effective. For example, on April 7, 1945 a force of sixty 262s took on a large force of Allied bombers with escort fighters. Armed with their four nose-mounted cannons, and underwing rockets the Swallows succeeded in downing or damaging 25 Allied B-17s on that single mission. While it is unlikely that the outcome of the War could have been altered by an earlier introduction or greater production totals for this aircraft, it is clear to many historians that the duration of the War might have been drastically lengthened if the Me-262 had not been too little too late.

See our aviation history timeline for all today's historical aviation events - air victories, aircraft losses and pilot details.

RECENT UPDATES TO OUR AVIATION HISTORY DATABASES
Flight Lieutenant Roy Pengilley added to aircrew database :
A pilot with 625 Sqn before being chosen for Pathfinders on Lancasters, joining 582 Sqn and completing 59 operations. Roy was wounded on a daylight operation spending two months in hospital, finally completing his tour in March 1945.
Updates made to Aircrew database for : D. C. Beddow : Squadrons updated (added No.51 Sqn RAF), Squadron service dates updated
Updates made to Aircrew database for : Clarke : Airframes updated (added Wellington R1004)
New victory claim added : He111 claimed on 19th August 1942 by Stanislaw Brzeski of No.317 Sqn RAF
32nd Bomb Squadron added to the squadrons database.
Flying Fortress Mk.F-85-BO 42-30040 of 337th Bomb Squadron added to the airframes database.
Updates made to Aircrew database for : R. Bradbury : Squadrons updated (added No.78 Sqn RAF), Squadron service dates updated
Updates made to Aircrew database for : P. F. G. Alcock : Squadrons updated (added No.78 Sqn RAF), Squadron service dates updated
Updates made to Aircrew database for : P. C. Morgan : Squadrons updated (added No.58 Sqn RAF), Squadron service dates updated
Updates made to Airframes database for : Hampden AD750 :
SEARCH OUR AVIATION HISTORY DATABASES

 

Contact Details
Shipping Info
Terms and Conditions
Classified Ads
Valuations

Join us on Facebook!

Sign Up To Our Newsletter!

Stay up to date with all our latest offers, deals and events as well as new releases and exclusive subscriber content!

This website is owned by Cranston Fine Arts.  Torwood House, Torwoodhill Road, Rhu, Helensburgh, Scotland, G848LE

Contact: Tel: (+44) (0) 1436 820269.  Fax: (+44) (0) 1436 820473. Email:

Follow us on Twitter!

Return to Home Page