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Skipper Comes Home by Robert Taylor (AP) - AviationArtPrints.com

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Skipper Comes Home by Robert Taylor (AP)


Skipper Comes Home by Robert Taylor (AP)

From the summer of 1942 until the end of hostilities, the USAAFs Eighth Air Force took the battle to enemy occupied Europe every single day that weather permitted. The largest air unit ever to go to war, the Eighth played a vital role in the ultimate defeat of Hitlers Germany. In the forefront of this awesome fighting force, the crews of the mighty B-17 Flying Fortress will be forever remembered.
Item Code : DHM2579APSkipper Comes Home by Robert Taylor (AP) - This Edition
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Artist Proof Edition. Edition of 25, with 4 signatures.

Image size 23.5 inches x 17 inches (60cm x 43cm) Greer, Paul H
Kincheloe, William P
Nielsen, Don
Paris, Robert
+ Artist : Robert Taylor


Signature(s) value alone : £130
£325.00

Quantity:
All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling



Other editions of this item : Skipper Comes Home by Robert TaylorDHM2579
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PRINTSigned Limited Edition of 500 prints. Includes 4 signatures. Image size 23.5 inches x 17 inches (60cm x 43cm) Greer, Paul H
Kincheloe, William P
Nielsen, Don
Paris, Robert
+ Artist : Robert Taylor


Signature(s) value alone : £130
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£200.00VIEW EDITION...
PRINTLimited edition of 25 remarques.

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Image size 23.5 inches x 17 inches (60cm x 43cm) Greer, Paul H
Kincheloe, William P
Nielsen, Don
Paris, Robert
+ Artist : Robert Taylor


Signature(s) value alone : £130
SOLD
OUT
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Signatures on this item
*The value given for each signature has been calculated by us based on the historical significance and rarity of the signature. Values of many pilot signatures have risen in recent years and will likely continue to rise as they become more and more rare.
NameInfo

Captain Robert Paris (deceased)
*Signature Value : £35

Joining up in June 1940, Rob Paris qualified with dual rating as pilot and navigator, flying a total of 52 combat missions on B17s. Posted first to the 8th Air Force in England, Rob flew with the 325th Squadron of the 92nd Bomb Group, completing his first mission in October 1942. In November he was posted to join the 12th Air Force in North Africa, again with B17s, joining the 342nd Squadron of the 97th Bomb Group. Amongst others, he participated in raids on the Italian Fleet in Trieste and Gorizia, the battle of Kasserine Pass, at Palermo during the Invasion of Sicily, as well as raids on the Italian mainland. Rob flew a total of 52 combat missions on B17s, and was Lead Navigator of many 100-plane missions. Sadly Rob passed away on the 21st September 2010, he was honored in december during a ceremony at National Cemetery in Phoenix with a fly over by a vintage B-25 aircraft.

First Lieutenant Don Nielsen
*Signature Value : £35

A pilot with the 457th Bomb Group, Don Nielson had joined up in February 1943, originally training for combat flying on B24 Liberators. In November 1944 he was posted to England, joining the 751st Squadron, 457th Bomb Group at Glatton flying B17 Fortresses - first as co-pilot and then as First Pilot, undertaking the first combat mission of his tour on 12 December 1944. On 3 February 1945 he took part in the big raid on Berlin, which was the heaviest concentration on the German capital so far in the war, encountering some of the most intense and accurate flak ever experienced by the Eighth. During his tour Don took part in a total of 34 raids, all on B17s.

Lieutenant Colonel William P Kincheloe
*Signature Value : £35

Bill Kincheloe joined the service in April 1942, training as a pilot. He was posted to England to join the 327th Squadron, 92nd Bomb Group (Fames Favoured Few), based at Podington in Bedford, flying B-17s. His first combat mission was on 18 December 1943, when the 92nd went to Kiel, and in the following months other notable targets included the heavily defended factories at Schweinfurt. Bill flew a total of 28 raids to the Reich during his tour, all on B-17s, and six of which he commanded. After World War II Bill flew KC135s during the Vietnam War. He retired from the service in 1972.

Major Paul H Greer
*Signature Value : £25

After arriving in England, the first of Paul Greers 35 combat missions took place on a freezing cold New Years Day, 1945, as co-pilot on B-17s. Flying out of Thurleigh in Bedfordshire with the 368th Squadron, 306th Bomb Group (The Reich Wreckers), the oldest operational Bomb Group in the 8th Air Force, Paul flew a total of 31 missions on Fortresses as co-pilot, and a further 4 as lead pilot. Amongst other targets in Germany, he went on the big raids to Dresden and Schweinfurt, and led led missions to Berlin, on which he came under heavy attack from the Luftwaffes fast Me262 jet fighters.

Some other related items available from this site, matching the aircraft, squadron or signatures of this item.

 Like many other missions they had undertaken in the summer of 1944, this one had been particularly cold, tough and dangerous for pilot Harry Seip and the crew of B17G <i>Silver Meteor</i>.  The First Lieutenant and his men had set out on that morning, 11th July 1944, from a peaceful Framlingham, on another arduous mission to Munich.  With their bomb load dropped the crew headed for home, but the battle-scarred Fortress had been hit more than once, leaving the inner port engine shot out and <i>Silver Meteor</i> had steadily dropped behind the fast-disappearing bomber stream.  Things were not looking good for Harry and his crew as the Luftwaffe fighters circled like sharks, closing in for an easy kill.  Luckily the enemy pilots were not the only ones that had spotted the ailing Fortress.  The P-51s of two of the best Aces in the Eighth Air Force - Bud Anderson and Kit Carson - had also seen the danger and came tearing out of the blue sky into the action.  Within minutes the German pilots had fled and the crew of <i>Silver Meteor</i> could breathe a sigh of relief.  With these two legendary Aces guiding them home, Harry and his men would survive to fight another day.  Harry Seip is now the last surviving member of the crew of <i>Silver Meteor</i>.  This remarkable event has lived vividly in his memory since the war and he has always been thankful to Bud Anderson for saving his life and those of his men.  Unfortunately, these two outstanding heroes have never been able to meet, but thanks to this new edition both can finally come together to add authenticity to this remarkable story by personally signing this poignant edition.
Wounded Warrior by Richard Taylor.
£110.00
  The first successful daylight raid on Berlin. Nicolas Trudgians painting relives the fearsome aerial combat on March 6, 1944, as B-17 Flying Fortresses of the 100th B.G. are attacked. Screaming in head-on, Fw190s of II./JG I charge into the bomber stream. With throttles wide open, 56th Fighter Group P-47 Thunderbolts come hurtling down to intercept. B-17 gunners are working overtime, the air is full of cordite, smoke, jagged pieces of flying metal and hot lead. We are in the midst of one of the fiercest aerial battles of the war.

First Strike on Berlin by Nicolas Trudgian. (FLY)
£2.00
 B-17 Fortresses of the Bloody Hundredth- the Eighth Air Forces 100th Bomb Group - return to Thorpe Abbotts following a raid on enemy oil refineries, September 11, 1944. Nicolas Trudgians moving tribute to the Bloody Hundredth shows the imaginatively named B-17, Heaven Can Wait, on final approach to Thorpe Abbotts after the intense battle on September 11, 1944. Skilfully piloted by Harry Hempy, the seriously damaged B-17G has struggled 500 miles home on two engines to make it back to England. They lost their tail gunner that fateful day. Below the descending bomber stream, an agricultural traction engine peacefully ploughs the wheat stubble in preparation for next year's vital crop, the farm workers oblivious to the unimaginable traumas so recently experienced by the crews of the returning B-17 Fortresses. <br><br>Signed by four pilots and crew who flew with the 100th Bomb Group in Europe during World War II.  <br>Published in 1999 - Issue price was £120.

Heaven Can Wait by Nicolas Trudgian.
£140.00
B-17G 2107027 is depicted limping home to Bassingbourn with the starboard outer propeller feathered following a raid during the Summer of 1944.  'Hikin' for Home' served with the 322nd Bomb Sqn, 91st Bomb Group as part of the 8th Air Force.  Escorting her home is Major George Preddy, the highest scoring P-51 pilot and sixth in the list of all-time top American Aces, seen here flying 413321 'Cripes a Mighty 3rd'.

Hikin' for Home by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
£300.00

The Aircraft :
NameInfo
Flying FortressIn the mid-1930s engineers at Boeing suggested the possibility of designing a modern long-range monoplane bomber to the U.S. Army Air Corps. In 1934 the USAAC issued Circular 35-26 that outlined specifications for a new bomber that was to have a minimum payload of 2000 pounds, a cruising speed in excess of 200-MPH, and a range of at least 2000 miles. Boeing produced a prototype at its own expense, the model 299, which first flew in July of 1935. The 299 was a long-range bomber based largely on the Model 247 airliner. The Model 299 had several advanced features including an all-metal wing, an enclosed cockpit, retractable landing gear, a fully enclosed bomb bay with electrically operated doors, and cowled engines. With gun blisters glistening everywhere, a newsman covering the unveiling coined the term Flying Fortress to describe the new aircraft. After a few initial test flights the 299 flew off to Wright Field setting a speed record with an average speed of 232-mph. At Wright Field the 299 bettered its competition in almost all respects. However, an unfortunate crash of the prototype in October of 1935 resulted in the Army awarding its primary production contract to Douglas Aircraft for its DB-1 (B-18.) The Army did order 13 test models of the 299 in January 1936, and designated the new plane the Y1B-17. Early work on the B-17 was plagued by many difficulties, including the crash of the first Y1B-17 on its third flight, and nearly bankrupted the Company. Minor quantities of the B-17B, B-17C, and B-17D variants were built, and about 100 of these aircraft were in service at the time Pearl Harbor was attacked. In fact a number of unarmed B-17s flew into the War at the time of the Japanese attack. The German Blitzkrieg in Europe resulted in accelerated aircraft production in America. The B-17E was the first truly heavily armed variant and made its initial flight in September of 1941. B-17Es cost $298,000 each and more than 500 were delivered. The B-17F and B-17G were the truly mass-produced wartime versions of the Flying Fortress. More than 3,400 B-17Fs and more than 8,600 B-17Gs would be produced. The American daylight strategic bombing campaign against Germany was a major factor in the Allies winning the War in Europe. This campaign was largely flown by B-17 Flying Fortresses (12,677 built) and B-24 Liberators (18,188 built.) The B-17 bases were closer to London than those of the B-24, so B-17s received a disproportionate share of wartime publicity. The first mission in Europe with the B-17 was an Eighth Air Force flight of 12 B-17Es on August 12, 1942. Thousands more missions, with as many as 1000 aircraft on a single mission would follow over the next 2 years, virtually decimating all German war making facilities and plants. The B-17 could take a lot of damage and keep on flying, and it was loved by the crews for bringing them home despite extensive battle damage. Following WW II, B-17s would see some action in Korea, and in the 1948 Israel War. There are only 14 flyable B-17s in operation today and a total of 43 complete airframes

See our aviation history timeline for all today's historical aviation events - air victories, aircraft losses and pilot details.

RECENT UPDATES TO OUR AVIATION HISTORY DATABASES
Updates made to Airframes database for : Blenheim L9270 : Airframe notes updated (added 04-04-1941 : Blenheim was on patrol off the Dutch coast before it was lost without trace. )
New victory claim added : Ju88 claimed on 15th March 1945 by Lieutenant Colonel Archie F Maltbie of 388th Fighter Squadron
New victory claim added : Bv238 claimed on 18th September 1944 by Urban Drew of 375th Fighter Squadron
Updates made to Airframes database for : Whitley Z6556 : Aircrew updated, Airframe notes updated (added 03-04-1941 : Whitley crashed at Trebeurden in France, killing all crew.)
Wellington Mk.IC X3167 of No.149 Sqn RAF added to the airframes database.
Updates made to Aircrew database for : Sergeant Alan Norman Feary : First name updated (now Alan Norman), Birth date updated, Victories updated, Aircraft updated (added Spiteful), Rank updated (now Sergeant)
Updates made to Aircrew database for : Pilot Officer Arthur C Dunlop : Aircraft updated (added Ventura), Squadrons updated, Squadron service dates updated
325th Bomb Squadron added to the squadrons database.
Updates made to Aircrew database for : Helmut Eberspacher : Date of death updated, Deceased updated, Squadron service dates updated
Updates made to Airframes database for : Anson K6296 : Aircrew updated (added J. Stransky), Airframe notes updated (added 01-04-1941 : Anson crash-landed at Honington following the loss of the starboard aileron.)
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