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Latest Aviation Release !

 Spitfire, Typhoon and Mosquito aircraft in a triple print made up of the three individual prints <i>MkIX Spitfire, June 1944</i>, <i>Hawker Typhoons</i> and <i>De Havilland Mosquito</i>.

Royal Air Force WW2 Aircraft Triptych by Barry Price.

" Spitfire, Typhoon and Mosquito aircraft in a triple print made up of the three individual prints MkIX Spitfire, June 1944, Hawker Typhoons and De Havilland Mosquito. "

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Latest 50 Aviation Prints / Paintings / Drawings

 Spitfire, Typhoon and Mosquito aircraft in a triple print made up of the three individual prints <i>MkIX Spitfire, June 1944</i>, <i>Hawker Typhoons</i> and <i>De Havilland Mosquito</i>.
Royal Air Force WW2 Aircraft Triptych by Barry Price.Click For DetailsDHM6559
 Messerschmitt Bf109E-7Bs belonging to III./JG27, during the Balkan Campaign of 1941.  The yellow and white painted areas were used as recognition markings, so that they were not fired upon by friendly ground units during their low-level sorties.
Messerschmitt Bf109E-7/Bs by Jerry Boucher.Click For DetailsDHM6556
 This aircraft is preserved at Newark Air Museum.
Vulcan B Mk2 XM594, 44 Rhodesia Squadron, RAF Waddington. (PHOTO) by R P Chapman.Click For DetailsDHM6555
 Spitfire QJ-K of No.92 Squadron intercepts a marauding pair of Ju88s over southern England.
92 Squadron Intercept by Jason Askew. (P)Click For DetailsB0561
616 (South Yorkshire) Squadron Gloster Meteor Mk.1 EE218.  Flown by Warrant Officer Sid Woodacre over Kent, August 1944.  No.616 Sqn was chosen as the first unit to equip with the Gloster Meteor jet fighter - thus becoming the first RAF Jet Squadron.
Meteoric Victory by Tom Marchant. (PC)Click For DetailsTM0002
 Avro Lancaster <i>City of Lincoln</i> depicted as she appeared in 1995.
City of Lincoln by Keith Woodcock. (PC)Click For DetailsKW0044

Shackletons by Keith Woodcock. (PC)Click For DetailsKW0043
Royal Air Force ground crew engineers work on the engine of a Lancaster at its squadron's airfield.  A fitting tribute to the Avro Lancaster bomber of Bomber Command and all the crews that flew in and also worked on this magnificent aircraft.
Lancasters by Keith Woodcock. (PC)Click For DetailsKW0002
 A flight of RAF Spitfires fly low over fields over occupied France, and are shown in their D-Day stripes.
Early Morning Sortie by Keith Aspinall. (PC)Click For DetailsKA0005

Supermarine Spitfire Mk.Ia N3093 of 616 Sqn RAF by Keith Woodcock. (PC)Click For DetailsWC0003
 Royal Air Force catalina over flys a Royal Navy Cruiser of Gibraltar while on patrol.
On the Prowl by Timothy OBrien. (PC)Click For DetailsTO0002
 A sole Lancaster returns over the snow covered fields of England, escorted home by a fighter. A fitting tribute to the air crews of the Lancaster squadrons of World War Two.
Last One Home by Keith Aspinall. (PC)Click For DetailsKA0009
 Yorkshire Warrior by Keith Aspinall. (PC)Click For DetailsKA0028
 Hurricane PZ865 of the Battle of Britain Memorial Flight.
The Last of the Many by Keith Woodcock. (PC)Click For DetailsKW0017
 No.7 Squadron.
Stirlings Ready by Keith Woodcock. (PC)Click For DetailsKW0011
Covered in snow, an Avro Lancaster bomber is parked as a winter's dawn approaches at its squadron's airfield.  A fitting tribute to the Avro Lancaster bomber of Bomber Command and all the crews that flew in this stalwart of the Royal Air Force bombing squadrons.
Unexpected Snow by Keith Woodcock. (PC)Click For DetailsKW0016

Blackburn Beverley C.Mk.1 XM108 of 84 Sqn RAF by Keith Woodcock. (PC)Click For DetailsWC0004
 A total of ten Lancasters carrying the code KM-X were lost between 17th January 1942 and 28th June 1945, with the loss of a total of 55 crew.
Winter Departure by Keith Woodcock. (PC)Click For DetailsKW0019
 The Memphis Belle, a Boeing-built B-17F-10-BO, manufacturer's serial number 3470, USAAC Serial No.41-24485, was added to the USAAF inventory on 15th July 1942 and delivered in September 1942 to the 91st Bombardment Group at Dow Field, Bangor, Maine.  She deployed to Prestwick, Scotland, on 30th September 1942, moving to a temporary base at RAF Kimbolton on 1st October, and then finally to her permanent base at Bassingbourn, England, on 14th October.  Each side of the fuselage bore the unit and aircraft identification markings of a B-17 of the 324th Bomb Squadron (Heavy); the squadron code 'DF' and individual aircraft letter 'A'.  Captain Robert K. Morgan's crew flew 29 combat missions with the 324th Bomb Squadron, all but four in the Memphis Belle. The aircraft's 25 missions were:<br>7 November 1942 - Brest, France  <br>9 November 1942 - St. Nazaire, France   <br>17 November 1942 - St. Nazaire, France  <br>6 December 1942 - Lille, France  <br>20 December 1942 - Romilly-sur-Seine, France  <br>30 December 1942 - Lorient, France (flown by Lt. James A. Verinis) <br>3 January 1943 - St. Nazaire, France  <br>13 January 1943 - Lille, France  <br>23 January 1943 - Lorient, France[ <br>14 February 1943 - Hamm, Germany  <br>16 February 1943 - St. Nazaire, France  <br>27 February 1943 - Brest, France  <br>6 March 1943 = Lorient France <br>12 March 1943 - Rouen, France <br>13 March 1943 - Abbeville, France <br>22 March 1943 - Wilhelmshaven, Germany <br>28 March 1943 - Rouen, France] <br>31 March 1943 - Rotterdam, Netherlands <br>16 April 1943 - Lorient, France <br>17 April 1943 - Bremen, Germany] <br>1 May 1943 - St. Nazaire, France <br>13 May 1943 - Meaulte, France (flown by Lt. C.L. Anderson) <br>14 May 1943 - Kiel, Germany (flown by Lt. John H. Miller) <br>15 May 1943 - Wilhelmshaven, Germany <br>17 May 1943 - Lorient, France <br>19 May 1943 - Kiel, Germany (flown by Lt. Anderson)
B-17 Memphis Belle by Keith Woodcock. (PC)Click For DetailsKW0010
 Sadly, but two examples of the Handly page Halifax exist today - the unrestored W1048 at the RAF Museum at Hendon, and the Yorkshire Air Museums pristine LV907 Friday the 13th, a rebuild from the remains of HR792.
A Friday in Winter by Keith Woodcock. (PC)Click For DetailsKW0018
 The Tempest of Wing Commander Roland Beamont DSO and Bar DFC and Bar, June 1944.
Lull Before the Storm by Keith Aspinall. (PC)Click For DetailsKA0014
 Returning from a night mission, two Wellington bombers return over the snow covered fields of England. A fitting tribute to the air crews of the Wellington squadrons of World War Two.
Wimpey Wonderland by Keith Aspinall. (PC)Click For DetailsKA0013
 A flight of Lancaster bombers from a Bomber Command squadron climb away from the British coastline on yet another bombing raid on Nazi held Europe. A superb painting and a great tribute to the crews of the Lancaster bomber squadrons.
Climbing Out by Keith Aspinall. (PC)Click For DetailsKA0011
 The Vulcan B2  takes off from Ascension Island to play a major role in Operation Corporate, the name given to the British military operation to retake the Falkland Islands.  The Vulcan would take part in the seven planned bombing missions during the Falklands campaign codenamed Operation Black Buck. Each mission would require a solo Vulcan Bomber (plus an airborne reserve Vulcan in case of problems with the first) to fly and bomb the Argentinean airfield at Port Stanley, requiring the support of 12 Handley Page Victor K2 tankers of 55 and 57 squadron on the outward journey and 2 Victors and a Nimrod on the return journey.
Falklands Bomber by Keith Aspinall. (PC)Click For DetailsKA0010
 Beaufighter and Torbeau of Coastal Command.
Trouble Brewing by Keith Aspinall. (PC)Click For DetailsKA0016
 The Handley Page Victor was developed and produced by the Handley Page Aircraft Company, which served during the Cold War. It was the third and final of the V-bombers operated by the Royal Air Force , the other two V-bombers being the Avro Vulcan and the Vickers Valiant. The Victor had been developed to perform as part of the United Kingdom's airborne nuclear deterrent. The Victor was the last of the V-bombers to be retired, the final aircraft being removed from service on 15th October 1993. In its refuelling role, the type had been replaced by the Vickers VC10 and the Lockheed Tristar.
Victor by Keith Aspinall. (PC)Click For DetailsKA0017
 The Vickers-Armstrongs Valiant was a British four-jet high-altitude bomber, once part of the Royal Air Force's V bomber nuclear force in the 1950s and 1960s. The Valiant was the first of the V bombers to become operational, and was followed by the Handley Page Victor and the Avro Vulcan; it was noticeably less advanced than its counterparts. The Valiant has the distinction of being the only V bomber to drop live nuclear weapons.
The Forgotten V Bomber by Keith Aspinall. (PC)Click For DetailsKA0024
 Returning from a night mission, a sole Lancaster returns over the snow covered fields of England. A fitting tribute to the air crews of the Lancaster squadrons of World War Two.
Breaking the Silence by Keith Aspinall. (PC)Click For DetailsKA0007
 Curtiss Tomahawk IIB of No.112 Sqn RAF, in combat with a Regia Aeronautica Fiat G.50, North Africa, 1941.
Curtiss Tomahawk IIB by Jerry Boucher.Click For DetailsDHM6552
 Gloster Sea Gladiators of the Hal Far Fighter Flight in combat with Italian Fiat CR.42s, Malta, 1940.
Gloster Sea Gladiator by Jerry Boucher.Click For DetailsDHM6551
 Fiat CR.42 'Falco' belonging to 162a Squadriglia, 161ø Gruppo, Regia Aeronautica.  The unit badge bears the words <i>Varda che te sbrego!</i> - 'Beware - I'll tear you open!'.
Fiat CR.42 'Falco' by Jerry Boucher.Click For DetailsDHM6550
 Lancasters of No.s IX and No.617 Squadrons en route from Russia to Kaa Fjord, Norway, to attack the battleship Tirpitz on 15th September 1944.
Target Tirpitz by Keith Aspinall.Click For DetailsKA0034

Avro Manchesters of 207 Sqn by Keith Woodcock.Click For DetailsKW0042

Lightning Strike by Keith Aspinall.Click For DetailsKA0033
 The Red Arrows perform one of their signature formations.
Arrowhead by Keith Aspinall.Click For DetailsKA0032

Tally Ho! by Thomas Gower.Click For DetailsDHM6549

Harrier GR7 of No.20(R) Squadron by D Mahoney.Click For DetailsDHM6548
 P-51 Mustangs come to the aid of a damaged and struggling B-24 Liberator as Luftwaffe fighters make an attack.
Help for the Straggler by Keith Aspinall.Click For DetailsKA0031
 10th May 1988 - the retirement of the English Electric Lightning.
Binbrook Finale by D Mahoney.Click For DetailsDHM6547

Supermarine Spitfire Mk.VB EN821 of No.243 Sqn by G Henderson.Click For DetailsDHM6546

Harrier GR7 of No.20(R) Sqn by G Henderson.Click For DetailsDHM6545
335th Fighter Squadron, 361st Fighter Group USAAF.
P-51D Mustang 41-3926 by G Henderson.Click For DetailsDHM6544
 The legendary <i>Friday the 13th</i> completed 128 missions, making it one of RAF Bomber Command's most successful aircraft, and marks the most operations by a Halifax aircraft.
Handley Page Halifax Mk.III LV907 of No.158 Sqn - 'Friday the 13th' by G Henderson.Click For DetailsDHM6543
 A Hawk trainer of No.100 Sqn.
Hawk T Mk.1A XX194 CO by G Henderson.Click For DetailsDHM6542
 A Short Sunderland of No.201 Sqn.
Short Sunderland Mk.5 ML778 NS-Z by G Henderson.Click For DetailsDHM6541
 709th Bomber Squadron, 447th Bomber Group USAAF.
Boeing B-17G 297976 D by G Henderson.Click For DetailsDHM6540
 A lone Spitfire of 266 Squadron is shown above the sunlit haze of London and the Thames, during the Battle of Britian. 266 Squadron was reformed on 30th October 1939 at RAF Sutton Bridge as a fighter squadron. The squadron was one of the Rhodesian gift squadrons and was named 266 (Rhodesia) Squadron in honour of the gift. Originally it was equipped with the Fairey Battle light bomber, but soon after in January 1940 it received the Supermarine Spitfire and became a fighter squadron. It was in action over Dunkirk in early June and fought in the Battle of Britain.
Guardian of Freedom by Timothy OBrien.Click For DetailsTO0006
 It is a record likely to stand for all time, Erich Hartmann's tally of 352 victories is more than any other pilot in history.  Posted to JG52 over Russia in August 1942 his new Kommodore, Dieter Hrabak, placed the novice pilot under the guidance of Paule Rossman, one of the unit's most experienced and respected Aces.  However, during his very first combat Hartmann became so disorientated that he got lost in cloud and ran out of fuel.  His undoubted skill as a pilot enabled him to survive the inevitable crash-landing, but a few days later and just minutes after scoring his first ever victory, he was shot down - again crash-landing. This time he only just escaped from his burning aircraft before it exploded.  Any other new pilot might have succumbed but Hartmann was made of sterner stuff and , with Rossman's help and guidance, it was not long before everyone in JG52 realised that he possessed exceptional skill.  By the summer of 1943 <i>the Blond Knight</i> and his colleagues were flying up to six missions a day and having now perfected his technique, it was unusual for him to finish a day without a victory.  Never claiming to be an expert marksman, his approach, which took nerves of steel and great flying skills, was to get as close to his enemy as possible before opening fire at the last minute.  Often flying head on, the risks of collision and damage were great - of the sixteen times Hartmann was brought down, eight were as a result of flying into the debris of his victim!  Hartmann's 352 victories were achieved with JG52 - all except one.  It happened during a brief two week spell at the beginning of February 1945 when the top Ace was placed in temporary command of I./JG53.  His new unit were based in Hungary where German Army Group South was in bitter retreat and the fighting was as tough and relentless as ever.  <i>The Blond Knight</i>portrays Erich Hartmann climbing out of his Bf109 G-6 at Weszperem's snow-covered airfield after returning from another arduous mission leading Stab I./JG53 with whom, on 4th February he downed a Yak-9.  It was his 337th victory.
The Blond Knight by Robert Taylor.Click For DetailsDHM6539
 Those Aces with over 100 victories were exceptional.  To reach 200 victories was a spectacular achievement.  Yet two men went even further and accomplished a feat that will never be repeated - both of them shot down more than 300 enemy aircraft which placed them in a league of their own.  They were the elite of the elite, and their names are legendary - Erich Hartmann and Gerhard Barkhorn.  It is no surprise that these iconic Aces scored their victories whilst flying with the legendary fighter wing JG52.  Active from the beginning of the war, the unit fought in the Battle of France, but suffered terrible losses during the Battle of Britain before transferring to the Eastern Front at the outset of Operation Barbarossa, and it was here that it solidified its fearsome reputation.  Operating the Bf109 throughout the war, the Geschwader boasted some of the greatest Luftwaffe pilots of world war two among its ranks - including the top three Aces of all time.  Such renowned pilots as Gunther Rall (275 victories), Wilhelm Batz (237 victories), Hermann Graf (212 victories) and Helmut Lipfert (203 victories) helped this formidable unit notch up more than 10,000 victories, making it the most successful fighter wing in history.  <i>Hunters at Dawn</i> features Hptm. Gerhard Barkhorn, Gruppenkommandeur of II./JG52.  The great Ace, flying his Bf109 G-6, leads the Stab as they climb out from their base near the Black Sea, early November 1943.  The crisp air of day break is temporarily punctuated by the roar of Daimler-Benz engines as the deadly Messerschmitt fighters set off on their daily hunt for Soviet aircraft over the front line.
Hunters at Dawn by Robert Taylor.Click For DetailsDHM6538
 Often referred to as the 'Whispering Giant', Bristol's sleek Type 175 Britannia represented a milestone in turboprop airliner design, although it was already something of an anachronism by the time it entered service, as the jet age was just getting underway. Nevertheless, 85 Britannias were built before production ceased in 1960, many serving with BOAC, as exemplified by G-ANBG, seen here before being re-registered because superstitious pilots disliked the letters 'NBG', believing them to be an acronym of 'No Bloody Good!'.
Bristol Britannia by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsDHM6537

Latest Robert Taylor and Richard Taylor Aviation Releases !

 It is a record likely to stand for all time, Erich Hartmann's tally of 352 victories is more than any other pilot in history.  Posted to JG52 over Russia in August 1942 his new Kommodore, Dieter Hrabak, placed the novice pilot under the guidance of Paule Rossman, one of the unit's most experienced and respected Aces.  However, during his very first combat Hartmann became so disorientated that he got lost in cloud and ran out of fuel.  His undoubted skill as a pilot enabled him to survive the inevitable crash-landing, but a few days later and just minutes after scoring his first ever victory, he was shot down - again crash-landing. This time he only just escaped from his burning aircraft before it exploded.  Any other new pilot might have succumbed but Hartmann was made of sterner stuff and , with Rossman's help and guidance, it was not long before everyone in JG52 realised that he possessed exceptional skill.  By the summer of 1943 <i>the Blond Knight</i> and his colleagues were flying up to six missions a day and having now perfected his technique, it was unusual for him to finish a day without a victory.  Never claiming to be an expert marksman, his approach, which took nerves of steel and great flying skills, was to get as close to his enemy as possible before opening fire at the last minute.  Often flying head on, the risks of collision and damage were great - of the sixteen times Hartmann was brought down, eight were as a result of flying into the debris of his victim!  Hartmann's 352 victories were achieved with JG52 - all except one.  It happened during a brief two week spell at the beginning of February 1945 when the top Ace was placed in temporary command of I./JG53.  His new unit were based in Hungary where German Army Group South was in bitter retreat and the fighting was as tough and relentless as ever.  <i>The Blond Knight</i>portrays Erich Hartmann climbing out of his Bf109 G-6 at Weszperem's snow-covered airfield after returning from another arduous mission leading Stab I./JG53 with whom, on 4th February he downed a Yak-9.  It was his 337th victory.

The Blond Knight by Robert Taylor.

" It is a record likely to stand for all time, Erich Hartmann's tally of 352 victories is more than any other pilot in history. Posted to JG52 over Russia in August 1942 his new Kommodore, Dieter Hrabak, placed the novice pilot under the guidance of Paule Rossman, one of the unit's most experienced and respected Aces. However, during his very first combat Hartmann became so disorientated that he got lost in cloud and ran out of fuel. His undoubted skill as a pilot enabled him to survive the inevitable crash-landing, but a few days later and just minutes after scoring his first ever victory, he was shot down - again crash-landing. This time he only just escaped from his burning aircraft before it exploded. Any other new pilot might have succumbed but Hartmann was made of sterner stuff and , with Rossman's help and guidance, it was not long before everyone in JG52 realised that he possessed exceptional skill. By the summer of 1943 the Blond Knight and his colleagues were flying up to six missions a day and having now perfected his technique, it was unusual for him to finish a day without a victory. Never claiming to be an expert marksman, his approach, which took nerves of steel and great flying skills, was to get as close to his enemy as possible before opening fire at the last minute. Often flying head on, the risks of collision and damage were great - of the sixteen times Hartmann was brought down, eight were as a result of flying into the debris of his victim! Hartmann's 352 victories were achieved with JG52 - all except one. It happened during a brief two week spell at the beginning of February 1945 when the top Ace was placed in temporary command of I./JG53. His new unit were based in Hungary where German Army Group South was in bitter retreat and the fighting was as tough and relentless as ever. The Blond Knightportrays Erich Hartmann climbing out of his Bf109 G-6 at Weszperem's snow-covered airfield after returning from another arduous mission leading Stab I./JG53 with whom, on 4th February he downed a Yak-9. It was his 337th victory. "

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 June 1940 and the freedom of Britain lay in the hands of a small band of young RAF fighter pilots. Facing them across the Channel, the all-conquering Luftwaffe stood in eager anticipation of an easy victory, one that would allow were Hitler's mighty armies to invade. So heavily were the odds stacked against the RAF, few gave Fighter Command a chance. The American ambassador to Britain reported that <i>democracy is finished in England</i>. He was wrong.  Although outnumbered more than five to one at the outset, as the savage aerial battles raged continuously over southern England, the courage and dedication of Fighter Command's young airmen gradually turned the tide. By the end of September the battle was won and, for the first time, the Luftwaffe had tasted defeat.  Richard Taylor's outstanding composition portrays a more reflective image of those heroic RAF fighter pilots in contrast perhaps to the deadly trials they faced on a daily basis. Just occasionally during that long hot summer of 1940 were rare moments of peaceful respite. Every minute off-duty was time to be savoured, especially for this particular young fighter pilot and his girl as they briefly pause along a quiet country lane to watch the Spitfires from 92 Squadron pass low overhead. For a few moments the distinctive roar of Merlin engines shatters the peace and they both know that this time tomorrow it will be him who will be flying into combat.

Quiet Reflection by Richard Taylor.

" June 1940 and the freedom of Britain lay in the hands of a small band of young RAF fighter pilots. Facing them across the Channel, the all-conquering Luftwaffe stood in eager anticipation of an easy victory, one that would allow were Hitler's mighty armies to invade. So heavily were the odds stacked against the RAF, few gave Fighter Command a chance. The American ambassador to Britain reported that democracy is finished in England. He was wrong. Although outnumbered more than five to one at the outset, as the savage aerial battles raged continuously over southern England, the courage and dedication of Fighter Command's young airmen gradually turned the tide. By the end of September the battle was won and, for the first time, the Luftwaffe had tasted defeat. Richard Taylor's outstanding composition portrays a more reflective image of those heroic RAF fighter pilots in contrast perhaps to the deadly trials they faced on a daily basis. Just occasionally during that long hot summer of 1940 were rare moments of peaceful respite. Every minute off-duty was time to be savoured, especially for this particular young fighter pilot and his girl as they briefly pause along a quiet country lane to watch the Spitfires from 92 Squadron pass low overhead. For a few moments the distinctive roar of Merlin engines shatters the peace and they both know that this time tomorrow it will be him who will be flying into combat. "

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See our aviation history timeline for all today's historical aviation events - air victories, aircraft losses and pilot details.

RECENT UPDATES TO OUR AVIATION HISTORY DATABASES
Updates made to Aircrew database for : Keatley : Squadrons updated (added No.58 Sqn RAF), Squadron service dates updated
Updates made to Aircrew database for : Leading Aircraftsman H Cooke : Squadron service dates updated
Updates made to Airframes database for : Wellington R1084 : Airframe notes updated (added 10-02-1941 : Wellington was damaged by a night-fighter and crash-landed at Narborough in Norfolk.)
Updates made to Airframes database for : Wellington T2888 : Aircrew updated
Updates made to Airframes database for : Whitley P4981 : Airframe notes updated (added 11-02-1941 : Whitley was ordered to divert to Dres but encountered bad weather and the Whitley was abandoned near Grimethrope in Yorkshire.)
Updates made to Airframes database for : Hampden AD750 :
Updates made to Aircrew database for : Warrant Officer E. Mayne : Squadron service dates updated, Rank updated (now Warrant Officer)
Updates made to Aircrew database for : : Airframes updated
Updates made to Airframes database for : Whitley P5013 : Airframe notes updated (added 11-02-1941 : Whitley was unable to comply with diversion order and subsequently was abandoned at Hatfield Military Complex.)
Updates made to Airframes database for : Hampden AD719 : Airframe notes updated (added 10-02-1941 : Hampden was shot down by an intruder and crashed near Grange Farm in Sudbrooke, Lincoln. Sergeants Butterworth and Caldwell were killed.)
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