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World War One Aces Postcard Pack.- Aviation Prints UK

DHM1807PC. Major John Gilmour by Ivan Berryman. <p> With 39 confirmed victories to his credit, Major John Gilmour is also recognised as the joint highest scoring pilot on the Martinsyde G.100 Elephant, an unusual score given the poor performance of this aircraft in one-on-one combat. He was awarded the DSO, MC and 2 Bars during the course of his flying career and in 1917 was posted to 65 Squadron as Flight Commander flying Sopwith Camels. On 1st July 1918, he downed three Fokker D.VIIs, a Pfalz and an Albatros D.V in the space of just 45 minutes.  In 1918 he was promoted to the rank of major and posted to command 28 Squadron in Italy, staying with the trusty Camel, but he did not add further to his score, although his final un-confirmed total may have been as high as 44. He is depicted here claiming his second kill on 24th September 1916 when he destroyed a Fokker E.1 whilst flying Elephant No 7284. <b><p>Collector's Postcard - Restricted Initial Print Run of 100 cards.<p>Postcard size 6 inches x 4 inches (15cm x 10cm)
DHM1764PC. Captain Andrew Beauchamp-Proctor by Ivan Berryman. <p> Standing just five feet two inches tall, Andrew Beauchamp-Proctor had to have his SE5a specially modified to accommodate his small stature, but the diminutive South African was a giant in the air, claiming a total of 54 victories before the end of the war, many of them observation balloons which made him one of the top balloon-busting aces of the RFC. But many aircraft fell to his guns, too, as here when on 21st August 1918 he claimed an Albatros C-Type as victory number 34 whilst flying D6856 of 84 Squadron. <b><p>Collector's Postcard - Restricted Initial Print Run of 100 cards.<p>Postcard size 6 inches x 4 inches (15cm x 10cm)
DHM1756PC. Major Arthur Coningham by Ivan Berryman. <p> Australian by birth and serving with the New Zealand army in the middle east at the outbreak of World War 1, Arthur Coningham joined the RFC in 1917 and was posted to 32 Squadron, flying DH.2s, as depicted here. It was in such a machine that Coningham scored the first of his 14 victories, sending down a German two seater over Ervillers. He survived the war and was made AOC Desert Air Force in 1941 before taking command of 2nd Tactical Air Force until the Second World War's end whereupon he became Air Marshal and was awarded a knighthood. He died in January 1948.  <b><p>Collector's Postcard - Restricted Initial Print Run of 100 cards.<p>Postcard size 6 inches x 4 inches (15cm x 10cm)
DHM1746PC. Major Albert Carter by Ivan Berryman. <p> The Sopwith Dolphin was a radical departure from previous Sopwith design philosophies, embodying a reverse-stagger on the wings, a water-cooled Hispano-Suiza engine and an unusual, but highly popular positioning of the cockpit which gave the pilot unprecedented views. One exponent of this purposeful looking machine was Canadian Major A D Carter who claimed many of his 31 victories flying the Dolphin. He is shown here sending an Albatross to the ground on 8th May 1918 whilst flying C4017. Carter was himself shot down soon after became a prisoner of war. He was killed in 1919 whilst test flying a Fokker D.VII at Shoreham, Sussex. <b><p>Collector's Postcard - Restricted Initial Print Run of 100 cards.<p>Postcard size 6 inches x 4 inches (15cm x 10cm)
DHM1702PC. Captain Andrew McKeever and 2nd Lieutenant Leslie Powell by Ivan Berryman. <p> The exploits of the partnership of McKeever and Powell in their 11 Squadron Bristol F.2B made them perhaps the most celebrated of all the Bristol Fighter crews, McKeever himself becoming the highest scoring exponent of this classic type with a closing tally of 31 victories. Powell was to secure a further 19 kills before both were withdrawn from front line service to Home Establishment in January 1918. Whilst on a lone patrol above enemy lines in November 1917, their aircraft (A7288) was attacked by two German two-seaters and seven Albatross scouts, four of which were sent to the ground through a combination of superb airmanship and outstanding gunnery. The remaining German aircraft continued to give chase until the F.2B was down to less than 20ft above the British trenches, at which point the Germans broke off their attack and fled. <b><p>Collector's Postcard - Restricted Initial Print Run of 100 cards.<p>Postcard size 6 inches x 4 inches (15cm x 10cm)
DHM1683PC. Captain Robert Little by Ivan Berryman. <p> With a final 47 victories to his credit, Robert Alexander Little was one of the highest-scoring British aces of World War 1, beginning his career with the famous No 8 (Naval) Squadron in 1916, flying Sopwith Pup N5182, as shown here. On 21st April 1917, he was attacked and shot down by six aircraft of Jasta Boelke, Little being thrown from the cockpit of his Sopwith Camel on impact with the ground. As the German aircraft swooped in to rake the wreckage with machine gun fire, Little pulled his Webley from its holster and began returning fire before being assisted by British infantry with their Lewis guns. Such was the character of this great pilot who finally met his death whilst attacking Gotha bombers on the night of 27th May 1918. <b><p>Collector's Postcard - Restricted Initial Print Run of 100 cards.<p>Postcard size 6 inches x 4 inches (15cm x 10cm)
DHM1646PC. Captain Roy Brown engages the Red Baron, 21st April 1918 by Ivan Berryman. <p> Mystery still surrounds just why Manfred von Richthofen risked so much in chasing the novice pilot Wilfred Wop May into Allied-occupied territory on the morning of Sunday, 21st April 1918, but it was to be his last flight, this error of judgement costing him his life. Von Richthofen had broken from the main fight involving Sopwith Camels of 209 Sqn to chase Mays aircraft, but found himself under attack from the Camel of Captain Roy Brown. All three aircraft turned and weaved low along the Somme River, the all red Triplane coming under intense fire from the ground as well as from Browns aircraft. No one knows exactly who fired the crucial bullet, but Manfred von Richthofens aircraft was seen to dive suddenly and impact with the ground. The Red Baron was dead and his amazing run of 80 victories was over. The painting shows Mays aircraft (D3326) in the extreme distance, pursued by DR.1 (425/17) and Browns Camel (B7270) in the foreground. <b><p>Collector's Postcard - Restricted Initial Print Run of 100 cards.<p>Postcard size 6 inches x 4 inches (15cm x 10cm)
DHM1638PC. Major Edward Mannock by Ivan Berryman. <p> Despite having sight in just one eye, Major Edward Mick Mannock was to become one of the most decorated and celebrated aces of World War 1, bringing down an official 61 enemy aircraft in just eighteen months before himself being brought down in flames by enemy ground fire. He was reluctant to add shared kills to his tally, so his actual total of victories is recorded at 73. His decorations include the VC, DSO and 2 Bars, MC and Bar and he is depicted here diving on enemy aircraft in SE5a D278 of 74 Sqn in April, 1918. <b><p>Collector's Postcard - Restricted Initial Print Run of 100 cards.<p>Postcard size 6 inches x 4 inches (15cm x 10cm)

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  Website Price: £ 16.00  

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World War One Aces Postcard Pack.

DPK1031. World War One Aces Postcard Pack.

Aviation Postcard Pack.

Items in this pack :

Item #1 - Click to view individual item

DHM1807PC. Major John Gilmour by Ivan Berryman.

With 39 confirmed victories to his credit, Major John Gilmour is also recognised as the joint highest scoring pilot on the Martinsyde G.100 Elephant, an unusual score given the poor performance of this aircraft in one-on-one combat. He was awarded the DSO, MC and 2 Bars during the course of his flying career and in 1917 was posted to 65 Squadron as Flight Commander flying Sopwith Camels. On 1st July 1918, he downed three Fokker D.VIIs, a Pfalz and an Albatros D.V in the space of just 45 minutes. In 1918 he was promoted to the rank of major and posted to command 28 Squadron in Italy, staying with the trusty Camel, but he did not add further to his score, although his final un-confirmed total may have been as high as 44. He is depicted here claiming his second kill on 24th September 1916 when he destroyed a Fokker E.1 whilst flying Elephant No 7284.

Collector's Postcard - Restricted Initial Print Run of 100 cards.

Postcard size 6 inches x 4 inches (15cm x 10cm)


Item #2 - Click to view individual item

DHM1764PC. Captain Andrew Beauchamp-Proctor by Ivan Berryman.

Standing just five feet two inches tall, Andrew Beauchamp-Proctor had to have his SE5a specially modified to accommodate his small stature, but the diminutive South African was a giant in the air, claiming a total of 54 victories before the end of the war, many of them observation balloons which made him one of the top balloon-busting aces of the RFC. But many aircraft fell to his guns, too, as here when on 21st August 1918 he claimed an Albatros C-Type as victory number 34 whilst flying D6856 of 84 Squadron.

Collector's Postcard - Restricted Initial Print Run of 100 cards.

Postcard size 6 inches x 4 inches (15cm x 10cm)


Item #3 - Click to view individual item

DHM1756PC. Major Arthur Coningham by Ivan Berryman.

Australian by birth and serving with the New Zealand army in the middle east at the outbreak of World War 1, Arthur Coningham joined the RFC in 1917 and was posted to 32 Squadron, flying DH.2s, as depicted here. It was in such a machine that Coningham scored the first of his 14 victories, sending down a German two seater over Ervillers. He survived the war and was made AOC Desert Air Force in 1941 before taking command of 2nd Tactical Air Force until the Second World War's end whereupon he became Air Marshal and was awarded a knighthood. He died in January 1948.

Collector's Postcard - Restricted Initial Print Run of 100 cards.

Postcard size 6 inches x 4 inches (15cm x 10cm)


Item #4 - Click to view individual item

DHM1746PC. Major Albert Carter by Ivan Berryman.

The Sopwith Dolphin was a radical departure from previous Sopwith design philosophies, embodying a reverse-stagger on the wings, a water-cooled Hispano-Suiza engine and an unusual, but highly popular positioning of the cockpit which gave the pilot unprecedented views. One exponent of this purposeful looking machine was Canadian Major A D Carter who claimed many of his 31 victories flying the Dolphin. He is shown here sending an Albatross to the ground on 8th May 1918 whilst flying C4017. Carter was himself shot down soon after became a prisoner of war. He was killed in 1919 whilst test flying a Fokker D.VII at Shoreham, Sussex.

Collector's Postcard - Restricted Initial Print Run of 100 cards.

Postcard size 6 inches x 4 inches (15cm x 10cm)


Item #5 - Click to view individual item

DHM1702PC. Captain Andrew McKeever and 2nd Lieutenant Leslie Powell by Ivan Berryman.

The exploits of the partnership of McKeever and Powell in their 11 Squadron Bristol F.2B made them perhaps the most celebrated of all the Bristol Fighter crews, McKeever himself becoming the highest scoring exponent of this classic type with a closing tally of 31 victories. Powell was to secure a further 19 kills before both were withdrawn from front line service to Home Establishment in January 1918. Whilst on a lone patrol above enemy lines in November 1917, their aircraft (A7288) was attacked by two German two-seaters and seven Albatross scouts, four of which were sent to the ground through a combination of superb airmanship and outstanding gunnery. The remaining German aircraft continued to give chase until the F.2B was down to less than 20ft above the British trenches, at which point the Germans broke off their attack and fled.

Collector's Postcard - Restricted Initial Print Run of 100 cards.

Postcard size 6 inches x 4 inches (15cm x 10cm)


Item #6 - Click to view individual item

DHM1683PC. Captain Robert Little by Ivan Berryman.

With a final 47 victories to his credit, Robert Alexander Little was one of the highest-scoring British aces of World War 1, beginning his career with the famous No 8 (Naval) Squadron in 1916, flying Sopwith Pup N5182, as shown here. On 21st April 1917, he was attacked and shot down by six aircraft of Jasta Boelke, Little being thrown from the cockpit of his Sopwith Camel on impact with the ground. As the German aircraft swooped in to rake the wreckage with machine gun fire, Little pulled his Webley from its holster and began returning fire before being assisted by British infantry with their Lewis guns. Such was the character of this great pilot who finally met his death whilst attacking Gotha bombers on the night of 27th May 1918.

Collector's Postcard - Restricted Initial Print Run of 100 cards.

Postcard size 6 inches x 4 inches (15cm x 10cm)


Item #7 - Click to view individual item

DHM1646PC. Captain Roy Brown engages the Red Baron, 21st April 1918 by Ivan Berryman.

Mystery still surrounds just why Manfred von Richthofen risked so much in chasing the novice pilot Wilfred Wop May into Allied-occupied territory on the morning of Sunday, 21st April 1918, but it was to be his last flight, this error of judgement costing him his life. Von Richthofen had broken from the main fight involving Sopwith Camels of 209 Sqn to chase Mays aircraft, but found himself under attack from the Camel of Captain Roy Brown. All three aircraft turned and weaved low along the Somme River, the all red Triplane coming under intense fire from the ground as well as from Browns aircraft. No one knows exactly who fired the crucial bullet, but Manfred von Richthofens aircraft was seen to dive suddenly and impact with the ground. The Red Baron was dead and his amazing run of 80 victories was over. The painting shows Mays aircraft (D3326) in the extreme distance, pursued by DR.1 (425/17) and Browns Camel (B7270) in the foreground.

Collector's Postcard - Restricted Initial Print Run of 100 cards.

Postcard size 6 inches x 4 inches (15cm x 10cm)


Item #8 - Click to view individual item

DHM1638PC. Major Edward Mannock by Ivan Berryman.

Despite having sight in just one eye, Major Edward Mick Mannock was to become one of the most decorated and celebrated aces of World War 1, bringing down an official 61 enemy aircraft in just eighteen months before himself being brought down in flames by enemy ground fire. He was reluctant to add shared kills to his tally, so his actual total of victories is recorded at 73. His decorations include the VC, DSO and 2 Bars, MC and Bar and he is depicted here diving on enemy aircraft in SE5a D278 of 74 Sqn in April, 1918.

Collector's Postcard - Restricted Initial Print Run of 100 cards.

Postcard size 6 inches x 4 inches (15cm x 10cm)


Website Price: £ 16.00  

To purchase these prints individually at their normal retail price would cost £20.00 . By buying them together in this special pack, you save £4




All prices are displayed in British Pounds Sterling

 

See our aviation history timeline for all today's historical aviation events - air victories, aircraft losses and pilot details.

RECENT UPDATES TO OUR AVIATION HISTORY DATABASES
New victory claim added : Fw190 (Probable victory.) claimed on 23rd September 1943 by Stanislaw Brzeski of No.302 Sqn RAF
Updates made to Airframes database for : Whitley T4217 : Airframe notes updated (added 11-02-1941 : Whitley's crew were unable to pinpoint their position and abandoned the aircraft at Bircham Newton. )
401st Bomb Squadron added to the squadrons database.
Updates made to Aircrew database for : Bell : Squadrons updated (added No.58 Sqn RAF), Squadron service dates updated
Updates made to Airframes database for : Whitley P4981 : Airframe notes updated (added 11-02-1941 : Whitley was ordered to divert to Dres but encountered bad weather and the Whitley was abandoned near Grimethrope in Yorkshire.)
Robinson added to aircrew database.
Updates made to Airframes database for : Wellington R1646 :
Updates made to Airframes database for : Hampden P4299 :
Updates made to Aircrew database for : Pilot Officer Robinson :
Updates made to Airframes database for : Hampden X3001 : Airframe notes updated (added 10-02-1941 : Hampden was shot down by a night-fighter and crashed north of Alkmaar in Holland.)
SEARCH OUR AVIATION HISTORY DATABASES

 

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