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Wing Commander Richard G B Summers (deceased) - Art prints and originals signed by Wing Commander Richard G B Summers (deceased)

Richard G B Summers

Richard G B Summers

7 / 5 / 2017Died : 7 / 5 / 2017

Wing Commander Richard G B Summers (deceased)

Richard G B Summers was a navigator on Blenheims with 219 squadron at the age of 18. He fought throughout the Battle of Britain and after the cmapaign served in West Africa and Gibraltar. After the war he served on V-Bombers and received an OBE for gallant and distinguished service during the Mau Mau emergency in Kenya during the 1950s. Richard Gordon Battensby Summers was born on 18th October 1921 in Beverley, East Yorkshire and was educated at Ermysteds Grammar School at Skipton. In April 1939 Richard joined The Royal Air Force as a direct-entry Airman u/t Observer. On 26th June he went to the Bristol Flying School, Yatesbury for basic navigation training, moved to B&GS Warmwell on 30th September and then completed his training with an astro-navigation course at St. Athan in November. On 4th December 1939 Summers was posted to Church Fenton to join 242 Squadron, as a navigator at the age of 18. The squadron was equipped with Blenheims. He went to 219 Squadron at Catterick on 16th April 1940. Summers left the squadron on 28th September to go to the Ferry Pool and Defence Flight Takoradi, in West Africa. In early July 1941 Summers aircraft made a wheels-up forced-landing on a beach in Liberia. To escape internment he walked 48 miles in bare feet before putting out to sea and being picked up by a British merchantman on the 5th. For this incident, Summers was awarded the AFM (gazetted 1st January 1942). Commissioned in May 1942, he was posted back to the UK where he was appointed Bombing Leader on Hudsons at No. 1 (Coastal) OTU Silloth on 12th October. Summers was posted to 48 Squadron at Gibraltar on 22nd May 1943 as Bombing Leader. He returned to the UK and on 1st March 1944 became Bombing Leader at No. 1 APC Aldergrove. Summers went on a Specialist Armament Course on 19th April, firstly at 2 School of Technical Training Cosford and from late June at the Empire Air Armament School at Manby. He was appointed Armament Staff Officer at HQ 15 Group Liverpool on 17th November 1944 and he moved to RAF Lossiemouth on 7th August 1945 as Station Armament Officer. Staying in the postwar RAF, in October 1946 Summers was posted to the staff of ACAS (Training) at the Air Ministry as an Acting Squadron Leader. Pre-selected for the RAF Staff College in 1949, he graduated at the end of 1950 and was appointed Command Weapons Officer at HQ Bomber Command. From August 1953 until January 1956 Summers was Deputy Station Commander at RAF East Leigh, Kenya during the Mau-Mau Emergency. He was made an OBE (gazetted 6th March 1956) for 'gallant and distinguished services in Kenya'. Back in the UK, Summers returned to flying and commanded 109 Squadron at Binbrook. In December 1956 he was promoted to Acting Wing Commander and took command of No. 2 Wing RAF Cosford. In July 1959 he did a RAF Flying College Course at RAF Manby. In January/March 1960 Summers did a conversion course on Vulcans and was then appointed Wing Commander Operations at RAF Finningley, a Vulcan station. In December 1962 he was posted to the staff of SHAPE in Europe, for 'nuclear activities'. He returned to the UK in December 1966 and became a staff officer in the Department of the Chief of Defence Staff. Summers retired from the RAF on 18th October 1968 as a Wing Commander. He died on 7th May 2017.

Items Signed by Wing Commander Richard G B Summers (deceased)

 The Battle of Britain commenced at the beginning of June 1940, and for the next two and a half gruelling months the young men of Royal Air Force Fighter Command, duelled with the cream of Goerings Luftwaffe over the skies of southern England.  It wa......Those Valiant Few by Robert Taylor.
SOLD OUT
The Battle of Britain commenced at the beginning of June 1940, and for the next two and a half gruelling months the young men of Royal Air Force Fighter Command, duelled with the cream of Goerings Luftwaffe over the skies of southern England. It wa......NOT
AVAILABLE
 The Battle of Britain commenced at the beginning of June 1940, and for the next two and a half gruelling months the young men of Royal Air Force Fighter Command, duelled with the cream of Goerings Luftwaffe over the skies of southern England.  It wa......Those Valiant Few by Robert Taylor. (AP)
SOLD OUT
The Battle of Britain commenced at the beginning of June 1940, and for the next two and a half gruelling months the young men of Royal Air Force Fighter Command, duelled with the cream of Goerings Luftwaffe over the skies of southern England. It wa......NOT
AVAILABLE
 The Battle of Britain commenced at the beginning of June 1940, and for the next two and a half gruelling months the young men of Royal Air Force Fighter Command, duelled with the cream of Goerings Luftwaffe over the skies of southern England.  It wa......Those Valiant Few by Robert Taylor. (B)
SOLD OUT
The Battle of Britain commenced at the beginning of June 1940, and for the next two and a half gruelling months the young men of Royal Air Force Fighter Command, duelled with the cream of Goerings Luftwaffe over the skies of southern England. It wa......NOT
AVAILABLE
 You can almost hear the roar of their mighty Merlin engines and feel the prop-wash in this salute to the Hawker Hurricane.  This classic portrayal of this much-loved fighter depicts a pair of Mk.I Hurricanes from No.32 Sqn leading the scramble away ......
Response to Call by Robert Taylor.
Price : £145.00
You can almost hear the roar of their mighty Merlin engines and feel the prop-wash in this salute to the Hawker Hurricane. This classic portrayal of this much-loved fighter depicts a pair of Mk.I Hurricanes from No.32 Sqn leading the scramble away ......

Quantity:
 You can almost hear the roar of their mighty Merlin engines and feel the prop-wash in this salute to the Hawker Hurricane.  This classic portrayal of this much-loved fighter depicts a pair of Mk.I Hurricanes from No.32 Sqn leading the scramble away ......
Response to Call by Robert Taylor. (AP)
Price : £330.00
You can almost hear the roar of their mighty Merlin engines and feel the prop-wash in this salute to the Hawker Hurricane. This classic portrayal of this much-loved fighter depicts a pair of Mk.I Hurricanes from No.32 Sqn leading the scramble away ......

Quantity:
 You can almost hear the roar of their mighty Merlin engines and feel the prop-wash in this salute to the Hawker Hurricane.  This classic portrayal of this much-loved fighter depicts a pair of Mk.I Hurricanes from No.32 Sqn leading the scramble away ......
Response to Call by Robert Taylor. (B)
Price : £210.00
You can almost hear the roar of their mighty Merlin engines and feel the prop-wash in this salute to the Hawker Hurricane. This classic portrayal of this much-loved fighter depicts a pair of Mk.I Hurricanes from No.32 Sqn leading the scramble away ......

Quantity:
 Spitfires of 616 Squadron scramble from RAF Kenley during the heavy fighting of the Battle of Britain, late August 1940.  Below them a Hurricane of 253 Squadron, sharing the same base, is being prepared for its next vital mission at a distant disper......
We All Stand Together by Robert Taylor. (B)
Price : £210.00
Spitfires of 616 Squadron scramble from RAF Kenley during the heavy fighting of the Battle of Britain, late August 1940. Below them a Hurricane of 253 Squadron, sharing the same base, is being prepared for its next vital mission at a distant disper......

Quantity:
 Sunday 15 September 1940 and Luftwaffe supremo Hermann Goering believed victory over the RAF was at hand. Today, he decreed, would be the day that his 'glorious' Luftwaffe would finally break the back of Fighter Command's stubborn resist......
The Greatest Day by Robert Taylor. (C)
Price : £495.00
Sunday 15 September 1940 and Luftwaffe supremo Hermann Goering believed victory over the RAF was at hand. Today, he decreed, would be the day that his 'glorious' Luftwaffe would finally break the back of Fighter Command's stubborn resist......

Quantity:
 Sunday 15 September 1940 and Luftwaffe supremo Hermann Goering believed victory over the RAF was at hand. Today, he decreed, would be the day that his 'glorious' Luftwaffe would finally break the back of Fighter Command's stubborn resist......
The Greatest Day by Robert Taylor. (D)
SOLD OUT
Sunday 15 September 1940 and Luftwaffe supremo Hermann Goering believed victory over the RAF was at hand. Today, he decreed, would be the day that his 'glorious' Luftwaffe would finally break the back of Fighter Command's stubborn resist......NOT
AVAILABLE

Packs with at least one item featuring the signature of Wing Commander Richard G B Summers (deceased)

Wing Commander Richard G B Summers (deceased)

Squadrons for : Wing Commander Richard G B Summers (deceased)
A list of all squadrons known to have been served with by Wing Commander Richard G B Summers (deceased). A profile page is available by clicking the squadron name.
SquadronInfo

No.109 Sqn RAF


Country : UK
Founded : 1st November 1917
Fate : Disbanded 1st February 1957

Primi hastati - The first of the legion

Click the name above to see prints featuring aircraft of No.109 Sqn RAF

No.109 Sqn RAF

The squadron first formed on 1 November 1917 as 109 Squadron Royal Flying Corps at South Carlton and began training on the de Havilland DH.9 bomber but was disbanded on 19 August 1918 without becoming operational On 10th December 1940, the squadron was re-born from the Wireless Intelligence Development Unit (WIDU) whose headquarters were at Boscombe Down, Wilts. Using Anson and Wellington aircraft it was engaged during the next two years in development of radio counter-measures and also new radar aids, notably the blind bombing system known as Oboe. In August, 1942, No. 109 moved to Wyton to become one of the original units of the Pathfinder Force.1 In December it converted to Oboe Mosquitoes and on 2Oth/21st made World War 2 history by flying the first Oboe sorties over enemy territory - on a calibration raid against a power station at Lutterade in Holland. Eight nights later, on 31st December/1st January 1943, it made history again when it pioneered Oboe target marking for a following force of heavy bombers; the target was Düsseldorf. The squadron remained an Oboe Mosquito marker unit for the rest of the war and from mid-1943 had a friendly PFF rival in No. 105 Squadron. One of No. 109's most outstanding successes was on 5/6th March, 1943, when eight of its Mosquitoes led Bomber Command's devastating assault on Essen which laid waste more than 160 acres of that city and heralded the Battle of the Ruhr. Included among the squadron's many other wartime claims to fame is the claim that the last bombs to be dropped on Berlin were dropped by one of its Mosquitos at 2.14am on 21st April, 1945. On 30 September 1945 the Squadron was disbanded. Among the scores of decorations won by No. 109 Squadron personnel was a Victoria Cross. It was awarded posthumously to Squadron Leader BAM Palmer, "in recognition of most conspicuous bravery" while flying a Lancaster of No. 582 Squadron (mainly with a 582 Squadron crew) and acting as Oboe leader of a Lancaster force against Cologne on 23rd December 1944. On 1 October 1945, No. 627 Squadron at Woodhall Spa was renumbered 109 Squadron and flew Mosquitoes as a target marking unit until conversion to Canberras began in July 1952. It eventually re-equipped with Canberras and saw action in the Suez campaign. With the increase of the V bomber force the squadron was no longer needed and was finally disbanded on 1 February 1957 at RAF Binbrook.

No.219 Sqn RAF


Country : UK
Founded : 22nd July 1918
Fate : Disbanded 31st July 1957

From dusk till dawn

Click the name above to see prints featuring aircraft of No.219 Sqn RAF

No.219 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.242 Sqn RAF


Country : UK
Founded : August 1918
Fate : Disbanded 30th September 1964
Canadian

Toujours pret - Always ready

Click the name above to see prints featuring aircraft of No.242 Sqn RAF

No.242 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.48 Sqn RAF


Country : UK
Founded : 15th April 1916
Fate : Disbanded 7th January 1976

Forte et fidele

Click the name above to see prints featuring aircraft of No.48 Sqn RAF

No.48 Sqn RAF

No. 48 Squadron of the Royal Flying Corps was formed at Netheravon, Wiltshire, on 15 April 1916. The squadron was posted to France in March 1917 and became the first fighter squadron to be equipped with the Bristol Fighter. One of the squadron's commanders was Keith Park, then a Major, who later led No. 11 Group of Fighter Command during the Battle of Britain as an Air Vice Marshal. The squadron became part of the Royal Air Force when the Royal Flying Corps merged with the Royal Naval Air Service in 1918. It moved by sea to India during May/June 1919, being based at Quetta. On 1 April 1920 the squadron was disbanded by renumbering it to No. 5 Squadron. The squadron had 32 aces serve in it. Besides Park, they included: Fred Holliday, John Letts, Brian Edmund Baker, Harold Anthony Oaks, Leonard A. Payne, Robert Dodds, John Theobald Milne, Charles Napier, Frank Ransley, Alan Wilkinson, Thomas Percy Middleton, William Price, future Air Marshal Charles Steele, Norman Craig Millman, Thomas G. Rae, Owen Scholte, Roger Hay, Norman Roberts, Joseph Michael John Moore, Arthur Noss and Maurice Benjamin The squadron reformed on 25 November 1935 at RAF Bicester, and became a General Reconnaissance unit operating Avro Anson aircraft. The Squadron was based at RAF Thorney Island between 28 September 1938 and 10 October 1938 before returning on 25 August 1939 and leaving for the last time on 16 July 1940 With the outbreak of war in 1939 the squadron was engaged in coastal patrols along the south coast of England. In 1941 the squadron re-equipped with Lockheed Hudson aircraft and took on the role of an anti-submarine squadron, patrolling first the North Sea; in December 1942 the squadron moved to RAF Gibraltar to patrol the Mediterranean. In 1944 the squadron returned to the UK and was re-equipped with Douglas Dakota aircraft. It remained a transport squadron until being disbanded on 16 January 1946. During this period it operated from Chittagong, Bengal, India on supply operations in the Irrawaddy valley of Burma. .
Aircraft for : Wing Commander Richard G B Summers (deceased)
A list of all aircraft associated with Wing Commander Richard G B Summers (deceased). A profile page including a list of all art prints for the aircraft is available by clicking the aircraft name.
SquadronInfo

Blenheim


Click the name above to see prints featuring Blenheim aircraft.

Manufacturer : Bristol
Production Began : 1935
Retired : 1956
Number Built : 4422

Blenheim

The Bristol Blenheim, the most plentiful aircraft in the RAFs inventory when WWII began, was designed by Frank Barnwell, and when first flown in 1936 was unique with its all metal monoplane design incorporating a retractable undercarriage, wing flaps, metal props, and supercharged engines. A typical bomb load for a Blenheim was 1,000 pounds. In the early stages of the war Blenheims were used on many daylight bombing missions. On the day that war was declared on Germany, a Blenheim piloted by Flying Officer Andrew McPherson was the first British aircraft to cross the German coast and the following morning 15 Blenheims from three squadrons set off on one of the first bombing missions The Blenheim units operated throughout the battle, often taking heavy casualties, although they were never accorded the publicity of the fighter squadrons. The Blenheim units raided German occupied airfields throughout July to December 1940, both during daylight hours and at night. Although most of these raids were unproductive, there were some successes; on 1 August five out of 12 Blenheims sent to attack Haamstede and Evere (Brussels) were able to bomb, destroying or heavily damaging three Bf 109s of II./JG 27 and apparently killing a Staffelkapitän identified as Hauptmann Albrecht von Ankum-Frank. Two other 109s were claimed by Blenheim gunners. Another successful raid on Haamstede was made by a single Blenheim on 7 August which destroyed one 109 of 4./JG 54, heavily damaged another and caused lighter damage to four more. There were also some missions which produced an almost 100% casualty rate amongst the Blenheims. One such operation was mounted on 13 August 1940 against a Luftwaffe airfield near Aalborg in north-western Denmark by 12 aircraft of 82 Squadron. One Blenheim returned early (the pilot was later charged and due to appear before a court martial, but was killed on another operation); the other 11, which reached Denmark, were shot down, five by flak and six by Bf 109s. Blenheim-equipped units had been formed to carry out long-range strategic reconnaissance missions over Germany and German-occupied territories, as well as bombing operations. In this role, the Blenheims once again proved to be too slow and vulnerable against Luftwaffe fighters and they took constant casualties While great heroism was displayed by the air crews, tremendous losses were sustained during these missions. The Blenhiem was easy pickings at altitude for German Bf-109 fighters who quickly learned to attack from below. To protect the vulnerable bellies of the Blenheims many missions were shifted to low altitude, but this increased the aircrafts exposure to anti-aircraft fire. In the German night-bombing raid on London on 18 June 1940, Blenheims accounted for five German bombers, thus proving that they were better-suited for night fighting. In July, No. 600 Squadron, by then based at RAF Manston, had some of its Mk IFs equipped with AI Mk III radar. With this radar equipment, a Blenheim from the Fighter Interception Unit (FIU) at RAF Ford achieved the first success on the night of 2–3 July 1940, accounting for a Dornier Do 17 bomber. More successes came, and before long the Blenheim proved itself invaluable as a night fighter. One Blenheim pilot, Squadron Leader Arthur Scarf, was posthumously awarded the Victoria Cross for an attack on Singora, Thailand, on 9 December 1941. Another bomber of No. 60 Squadron RAF was credited with shooting down Lt Col Tateo Katō's Nakajima Ki-43 fighter and badly damaging two others in a single engagement on 22 May 1942, over the Bay of Bengal. Katō's death was a severe blow to the Imperial Japanese Army Air Force.

Vulcan




Click the name above to see prints featuring Vulcan aircraft.

Manufacturer : Avro
Production Began : 1955

Vulcan

The Avro Vulcan was the worlds first delta winged heavy bomber. the first prototype flew on the 30th August 1952 and the first production Vulcan flew in February 1955. The first Avro Vulcan's arrived for service with the Royal Air Force with 230 operational Conversion Unit (OCU) at RAF Finningley in May 1956. with the first squadron to receive the Vulcan in July 1957 was 83 squadron. In April 1968 Bomber Command merged into the Newly created Strike Command with eight Squadrons being equipped with Vulcan's. A terrain Hugging variant was introduced (the Vulcan SR2) in 1973, to all squadrons except no. 27 squadron (Flying Elephants) which was a Maritime reconnaissance Sqd. The Last Major role for the Avro Bomber was the bombing of Argentinean Airfields in the Falkland Islands During The Falklands Conflict The Avro Vulcan high Altitude Bomber with a crew of five. Top Speed 650 mph with a ceiling of 60,000 feet. maximum range of 5750 miles (with in flight refuelling). with a conventional bomb load of 21 x 1000 lb bombs

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Updates made to Aircrew database for : Keatley : Squadrons updated (added No.58 Sqn RAF), Squadron service dates updated
324th Bomb Squadron added to the squadrons database.
New victory claim added : Me109 (Probable victory.) claimed on 11th November 1940 by Robert Innes of No.253 Sqn RAF
Updates made to Aircrew database for : Sergeant P E Wilks : Squadron service dates updated
Updates made to Airframes database for : Spitfire P9368 : Airframe notes updated (added 06-03-1940 : Joined No.92 Sqn. & 26-08-1940 : Joined No.616 Sqn. & 02-09-1940 : Joined No.72 Sqn. & 03-05-1941 : Joined No.111 Sqn. & 17-07-1941 : Joined No.132 Sqn. & 31-07-1941 : Damaged in flying accident. & 09-02-1945 : Struck off.)
New victory claim added : (V-1 flying bomb.) claimed on 9th July 1944 by William Hoy of No.25 Sqn RAF
Updates made to Aircrew database for : Bell : Squadrons updated (added No.58 Sqn RAF), Squadron service dates updated
32nd Bomb Squadron added to the squadrons database.
Updates made to Airframes database for : Whitley T4217 : Airframe notes updated (added 11-02-1941 : Whitley's crew were unable to pinpoint their position and abandoned the aircraft at Bircham Newton. )
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