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Robert Weiler USAAF - Art prints and originals signed by Robert Weiler USAAF

Robert Weiler

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Robert Weiler USAAF

Shortly after the attack on Pearl Harbor, Bob Weiler enlisted in the Army, seving in field artillery and the newly formed Tank Destroyer Forces. In September 1943 he began flight training in the Army Air Corps as an aerial gunner, first on B-17s, and eventually as an electrical specialist gunner aboard the new B-29 Superfortresses. Stationed on Guam, he flew many 3000 mile combat missions of 18 hours per flight against the Japanese home islands. On his 14th mission, to Osaka, his plane was badly shot up. His crew bailed out, narrowly escaping the complete destruction of their plane, which exploded just before hitting the water. Bob and his surviving crew were picked up by submarine. Over the course of his 19 combat missions, Bobs crew made emergency landings on Iwo Jima on a number of occasions, due either to battle damage or engine problems. He was honorably discharged as a Sergeant in December 1945. Bob is retired, living in the Sarasote, Florida area. His decorations include two Air Medals, Purple Heart, Pacific Theater Medal with Air Offensive Japan Star, and other WWII service medals.

Items Signed by Robert Weiler USAAF

 Only 660 miles from Tokyo, the small volcanic island of Iwo Jima was recognized as early as 1943 as being a vital location to secure an airbase for allied aircraft, in order to achieve victory in the Pacific.  Forseeing this goal, the Japanese began......
Iwo Jima - A Hard Won Haven by John D Shaw.
Price : £165.00
Only 660 miles from Tokyo, the small volcanic island of Iwo Jima was recognized as early as 1943 as being a vital location to secure an airbase for allied aircraft, in order to achieve victory in the Pacific. Forseeing this goal, the Japanese began......

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 Only 660 miles from Tokyo, the small volcanic island of Iwo Jima was recognized as early as 1943 as being a vital location to secure an airbase for allied aircraft, in order to achieve victory in the Pacific.  Forseeing this goal, the Japanese began......
Iwo Jima - A Hard Won Haven by John D Shaw. (AP)
SOLD OUT
Only 660 miles from Tokyo, the small volcanic island of Iwo Jima was recognized as early as 1943 as being a vital location to secure an airbase for allied aircraft, in order to achieve victory in the Pacific. Forseeing this goal, the Japanese began......NOT
AVAILABLE

Packs with at least one item featuring the signature of Robert Weiler USAAF

Robert Weiler USAAF

Aircraft for : Robert Weiler USAAF
A list of all aircraft associated with Robert Weiler USAAF. A profile page including a list of all art prints for the aircraft is available by clicking the aircraft name.
SquadronInfo

Flying Fortress




Click the name above to see prints featuring Flying Fortress aircraft.

Number Built : 12677

Flying Fortress

In the mid-1930s engineers at Boeing suggested the possibility of designing a modern long-range monoplane bomber to the U.S. Army Air Corps. In 1934 the USAAC issued Circular 35-26 that outlined specifications for a new bomber that was to have a minimum payload of 2000 pounds, a cruising speed in excess of 200-MPH, and a range of at least 2000 miles. Boeing produced a prototype at its own expense, the model 299, which first flew in July of 1935. The 299 was a long-range bomber based largely on the Model 247 airliner. The Model 299 had several advanced features including an all-metal wing, an enclosed cockpit, retractable landing gear, a fully enclosed bomb bay with electrically operated doors, and cowled engines. With gun blisters glistening everywhere, a newsman covering the unveiling coined the term Flying Fortress to describe the new aircraft. After a few initial test flights the 299 flew off to Wright Field setting a speed record with an average speed of 232-mph. At Wright Field the 299 bettered its competition in almost all respects. However, an unfortunate crash of the prototype in October of 1935 resulted in the Army awarding its primary production contract to Douglas Aircraft for its DB-1 (B-18.) The Army did order 13 test models of the 299 in January 1936, and designated the new plane the Y1B-17. Early work on the B-17 was plagued by many difficulties, including the crash of the first Y1B-17 on its third flight, and nearly bankrupted the Company. Minor quantities of the B-17B, B-17C, and B-17D variants were built, and about 100 of these aircraft were in service at the time Pearl Harbor was attacked. In fact a number of unarmed B-17s flew into the War at the time of the Japanese attack. The German Blitzkrieg in Europe resulted in accelerated aircraft production in America. The B-17E was the first truly heavily armed variant and made its initial flight in September of 1941. B-17Es cost $298,000 each and more than 500 were delivered. The B-17F and B-17G were the truly mass-produced wartime versions of the Flying Fortress. More than 3,400 B-17Fs and more than 8,600 B-17Gs would be produced. The American daylight strategic bombing campaign against Germany was a major factor in the Allies winning the War in Europe. This campaign was largely flown by B-17 Flying Fortresses (12,677 built) and B-24 Liberators (18,188 built.) The B-17 bases were closer to London than those of the B-24, so B-17s received a disproportionate share of wartime publicity. The first mission in Europe with the B-17 was an Eighth Air Force flight of 12 B-17Es on August 12, 1942. Thousands more missions, with as many as 1000 aircraft on a single mission would follow over the next 2 ½ years, virtually decimating all German war making facilities and plants. The B-17 could take a lot of damage and keep on flying, and it was loved by the crews for bringing them home despite extensive battle damage. Following WW II, B-17s would see some action in Korea, and in the 1948 Israel War. There are only 14 flyable B-17s in operation today and a total of 43 complete airframes

Superfortress


Click the name above to see prints featuring Superfortress aircraft.


Superfortress

The largest and most powerful bomber of WW II, the Boeing B-29 Super Fortress, played a major role in bringing about the defeat of Japan. In addition to accelerating Japans surrender following the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki with atomic bombs, thousands of B-29 crews flew tens of thousands of bombing missions against Japan from bases in China, India, and later in the War from recaptured islands in the Pacific. B-29s entered service in 1943 following a lengthy, problem-filled, development process of three years in response to the governments request for a long range strategic bomber. Only Boeing and Douglas (the B-32 Dominator) responded to the governments requests, and the B-32 had even greater development problems than the B-29. Powered by four giant Wright R-3350-23 radial engines generating a total horsepower of 8,924, the Super Fortresses typically carried crews of ten. They were capable of a top speed of 357-MPH, and at slower cruising speeds had a range of more than 3,200 miles. The B-29 was a large aircraft for its time with a wingspan in excess of 140 feet and a length of just under 100 feet. The Super Forts also had pressurized forward and aft hulls, which made the long distance missions a bit more comfortable for the flight crews. B-29s typically carried defensive armament which included ten machine guns and a single tail-mounted canon. Because of the pressurized hull, the guns were operated by remote control. The first operational B-29 wing was the 58th which flew out of the China-Burma-India theater. On March 9, 1945 General Curtis LeMay ordered an unusual low altitude attack on Tokyo by hundreds of B-29s carrying incendiary bombs. Five such low level missions were scheduled over a ten-day period, and the combined destruction of these missions exceeded that of either of the atomic bomb missions. B-29s were also effectively used to mine Japanese ports and shipping lanes.

See our aviation history timeline for all today's historical aviation events - air victories, aircraft losses and pilot details.

RECENT UPDATES TO OUR AVIATION HISTORY DATABASES
Updates made to Aircrew database for : W. H. Lowson : Squadrons updated (added No.83 Sqn RAF), Squadron service dates updated
Updates made to Airframes database for : Wellington T2610 : Airframe notes updated (added 10-02-1941 : Wellington lost engine power and ditched into the North Sea. The injured crew were rescued by the SS Tovelil two days later.)
Flight Lieutenant Robert Charles Platt added to aircrew database :
Killed aged 29 on 4th July 1943 when his Stirling BK718 WP-M of No.90 Sqn was shot down and crashed near Cologne. He is buried in Overloon War Cemetery. Son of James Francis and Amelia Louisa Minnie Platt, of Teddington, Middlesex.
Flying Fortress Mk.F-85-BO 42-30046 of 546th Bomb Squadron added to the airframes database.
New victory claim added : Fw190 (Probable victory.) claimed on 26th July 1942 by Stanislaw Brzeski of No.317 Sqn RAF
Updates made to Airframes database for : Whitley T4322 : Airframe notes updated (added 11-02-1941 : Whitley was abandoned and crashed at Wishaw, near Glasgow. )
Updates made to Aircrew database for : Pates : Squadrons updated (added No.149 Sqn RAF), Squadron service dates updated
Pilot Officer Andrew Patrick Gilmour added to aircrew database :
Killed aged 26 on 4th July 1943 when his Stirling BK718 WP-M of No.90 Sqn was shot down and crashed near Cologne. He is buried in Overloon War Cemetery. Son of Andrew Patrick Gilmour and Annie Gilmour, husband of Hilda Gertrude Gilmour, of Laindon, Essex.
567 Bomb Squadron added to the squadrons database.
Updates made to Aircrew database for : J. Badcock : Squadrons updated (added No.83 Sqn RAF), Squadron service dates updated
SEARCH OUR AVIATION HISTORY DATABASES

 

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