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332nd Fighter Group
Country : US



332nd Fighter Group Aviation Art Prints, Paintings and Drawings
Aviation Art
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Red Tail Escort by Richard Taylor.


Red Tail Escort by Richard Taylor.

With the words of his Group CO ringing in his ears, a pilot of the 332nd Fighter Group returns to protect a crippled American B17 bomber after downing two Me109s in quick succession. Agonisingly, two more enemy fighters were left to escape but the pilot knew that under the strict leadership of Colonel Benjamin O Davis, his mission, and that if the other all-black pilots of the 332nd, was solely to protect the bombers. That iron discipline was to earn this famous unit the respect and admiration of hundreds of bomber crews, and to create a legend. Despite lingering racial prejudice and some opposition within the Air Force, President Roosevelt had ordered the USAAF to form an all-black fighter pilot unit, its crews to be trained at Tuskegee in Alabama. To the surprise of their critics, the Tuskegee Airmen were to prove their detractors spectacularly wrong from the first day they went into action in Italy in May 1943. Flying first with the Twelfth Air Force, then the Fifteenth, the fo.........


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Item Code : DHM2703Red Tail Escort by Richard Taylor. - Editions Available
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PRINT Signed limited edition of 600 prints.
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Paper size 30 inches x 23.5 inches (76cm x 60cm) McGee, Charles
Gray, Leo R
Hardy, George E
Holloman, William H
Jefferson, Alexander
Steward, Lowell
+ Artist : Richard Taylor


Signature(s) value alone : £180
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Limited edition of 25 artist proofs.
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Paper size 30 inches x 23.5 inches (76cm x 60cm) McGee, Charles
Gray, Leo R
Hardy, George E
Holloman, William H
Jefferson, Alexander
Steward, Lowell
+ Artist : Richard Taylor


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PRINT Limited edition of 25 remarques.
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Paper size 30 inches x 23.5 inches (76cm x 60cm) McGee, Charles
Gray, Leo R
Hardy, George E
Holloman, William H
Jefferson, Alexander
Steward, Lowell
+ Artist : Richard Taylor


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PRINT Limited edition of 10 double remarques.
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Paper size 30 inches x 23.5 inches (76cm x 60cm) McGee, Charles
Gray, Leo R
Hardy, George E
Holloman, William H
Jefferson, Alexander
Steward, Lowell
+ Artist : Richard Taylor


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A Perfect Record by Stan Stokes.


A Perfect Record by Stan Stokes.

At the time of World War II there was still a great deal of prejudice in America, and this extended to all the branches of the military. Although black soldiers and seaman fought with dignity and bravery during WW I, many thought that blacks were incapable of handling difficult assignments. It was therefore with great uncertainty and trepidation that the Army Air Corps authorized the training of black pilots in 1941. The Air Corps proposed that a segregated training program be established. Judge William Hastie, Dean of the Howard University Law School, who was serving as a Civilian Assistant for Negro Affairs to the Secretary of War, protested about the segregated training, but his complaints were ignored. Hastie also proposed that the Army consider affiliating with the Tuskegee Institute which had already established a pilot training program. The Army allocated $1 million for the construction of the Tuskegee Army Air Field. The men sent to Tuskegee had to pass rigorous physical tests.........


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Item Code : STK0030A Perfect Record by Stan Stokes. - Editions Available
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PRINT Signed limited edition of 4750 prints.
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Print size 16 inches x 11.5 inches (41cm x 30cm) Artist : Stan Stokes£10 Off!Now : £28.00

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PRINT Signed limited edition of 225 prints.
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Size 16 inches x 11.5 inches (41cm x 30cm) McGee, Charles
+ Artist : Stan Stokes


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PRINT Limited edition of 100 giclee art prints.
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Size 21 inches x 14 inches (53cm x 36cm)Artist : Stan Stokes£109.00

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Limited edition of 100 giclee canvas prints.
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Limited edition of 100 giclee canvas prints.
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Size 36 inches x 24 inches (91cm x 61cm)none£484.00

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Fighting Red Tails by Robert Taylor.


Fighting Red Tails by Robert Taylor.

With their distinctive red tails, P-51 Mustangs of the 332nd Fighter Group - the famed Tuskegee Airmen, climb to operational height as B17 Fortresses from the 483rd Bomb Group manoeuvre into formation at the start of another long and dangerous mission over Germany, Oct 1944. A welcome sight for the Fortress crews, the renowned all-black Tuskegee pilots were credited for never losing an escorted bomber to enemy aircraft. For the first time ever Robert pays tribute to the Tuskegee Fighter Pilots in this stunning portrait of one of the most famous fighter units of WWII.
Item Code : DHM2596Fighting Red Tails by Robert Taylor. - Editions Available
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PRINT Signed limited edition of 800 prints.
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Print paper size 33 inches x 23.5 inches (84cm x 60cm) McGee, Charles
Hudson, Elbert
Steward, Lowell
Sherman, Arthur
Walden, Leon
+ Artist : Robert Taylor


Signature(s) value alone : £150
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Limited edition of 25 artist proofs.
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Print paper size 33 inches x 23.5 inches (84cm x 60cm) McGee, Charles
Hudson, Elbert
Steward, Lowell
Sherman, Arthur
Walden, Leon
+ Artist : Robert Taylor


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The Red Tails Never Lost a Bomber by Clyde Heron.


The Red Tails Never Lost a Bomber by Clyde Heron.

A harbinger of Adolf Hitlers grand scheme came on March 1, 1938, when Nazi troops moved into the Rhineland, but it hardly raised an eyebrow in the international circles. His treachery did not rear its ugly head again for nearly two years. The worlds perception of the little corporal was radically changed when his blitzkrieg enveloped Austria and rolled through Czechoslovakia, Poland, Norway and the Netherlands. Then on May 28, 1940, Belgium fell, exposing France to the onslaught. Although President Franklin Roosevelt had long realized that the United States entrance into the war was inevitable, it took the invasion of France to awaken the American public to the horrors of this madmans actions. Roosevelt then found overwhelming public support for his appeal for military preparedness. When the massive war mobilization program began, African-Americans were overlooked. The attitudes and apathy of the Federal Government and military officials caused African-American leaders and thei.........


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Item Code : DHM8013The Red Tails Never Lost a Bomber by Clyde Heron. - Editions Available
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PRINTSigned limited edition of 850 prints.
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Image size 26 inches x 17 inches (66cm x 43cm)Artist : Clyde HeronSOLD
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Aircraft for : 332nd Fighter Group
A list of all aircraft known to have been flown by 332nd Fighter Group. A profile page including a list of all art prints for the aircraft is available by clicking the aircraft name.
SquadronInfo

Lightning




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Manufacturer : Lockheed

Lightning

Designed by Kelly Johnson the P38 made its maiden flight on the 27th January 1939 and introduced into service in 1941. they cost $134,284 at the time each and a total of 10,037 were built. The Lockheed P-38 was introduced as a inceptor fighter but soon proved a valuable long range bomber escort for the 8thUS Air Force's B-17 and-24 bombers as they bombed targets further into Germany.

Mustang




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Manufacturer : North American

Mustang

The ubiquitous North American P-51 Mustang, which many consider to be the best all-around fighter of WW II, owes its origins to the British Air Ministry. Following Britains entry into WW II in 1939, the RAF was interested in purchasing additional fighter aircraft from American sources, particularly the Curtiss P-40. Curtiss, which was busy, was unable to guarantee timely delivery so the British approached North American Aviation as a possible second source for the P-40. North American chose to propose its own fighter design which would use the same Allison engine as the P-40. Utilizing new laminar flow wings, the North American fighter was expected to have performance better than the P-40. Developed in record time the new aircraft was designated as a Mustang I by the Brits, whereas the USAAF ordered two for evaluation which were designated XP-51 Apaches. Intrigued with the possibility of using this aircraft also as a dive bomber, North American proposed this to the USAAF which decided to order 500 of the P-51 aircraft to be modified for dive bombing use. Designated as the A-36 Invader, this version of the Mustang utilized dive flaps, and bomb racks under each wing. Some reinforcing of the structural members was also required because of the G-forces to be encountered in dive bombing. A-36s entered combat service with the USAAF prior to any P-51s. In early 1943 the 86th and 27th Fighter Bomber Groups of the 12th Air Force began flying A-36s out of Northern Africa. Despite some early problems with instability caused by the dive flaps, the A-36 was effective in light bombing and strafing roles. It was not, however, capable of dog fighting with German fighters, especially at higher altitudes. Despite these drawbacks one USAAF pilot, Captain Michael T. Russo, who served with the 16th Bomb Squadron of the 27th Fighter Bomber Group, was credited with five confirmed aerial victories in the A-36, thereby becoming the first mustang ace.

Thunderbolt




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Production Began : 1943
Number Built : 15683

Thunderbolt

Alexander Kartveli was a engineer with Seversky Aircraft who designed the P-35, which first flew in 1937. With Republic Aviation Kartveli supervised the development of the P-43 Lancer. Neither of these aircraft were produced in large numbers, and neither was quite successful. However, the Republic Aviation P-47 Thunderbolt, also nicknamed the Jug, was quite a different story. The Jug was the jewel in Kartvelis design crown, and went on to become one of the most produced fighter aircraft of all time with 15,683 being manufactured. The P-47 was the largest and heaviest single seat fighter of WW II. The P-47 immediately demonstrated its excellent combat qualities, including speed, rate of climb, maneuverability, heavy fire power, and the ability to take a lot of punishment. With a wingspan of more than 40 feet and a weight of 19,400 pounds, this large aircraft was designed around the powerful 2000 HP Pratt and Whitney R-2800 Double Wasp radial engine. The first P-47 prototype flew in May of 1941, and the primary variant the P-47D went into service in 1943 with units of the U.S. Armys Eighth Air Force. The Jug had a maximum speed in excess of 400 MPH, a service ceiling in excess of 42,000 feet, and was heavily armed with either six or eight heavy caliber machine guns. With its ability to carry up to a 2,500 pound bomb load, the Jug saw lots of use in ground attack roles. Until the introduction of the N model, the P-47 lacked the long range required for fighter escort missions which were most often relegated to P-51 Mustangs or P-38 Lightnings. In his outstanding painting entitled Bridge Busting Jugs, noted aviation artist Stan Stokes depicts Eighth Air Force Jugs in a ground attack mission in the Alps in June of 1944. The top P-47 ace was Francis Gabreski who had flown with the 56th Fighter Group, the first unit to be equipped with the P-47. In August of 1943 Gabreski attained his first aerial combat victory (over an Fw-190) and by years end he had reached ace status with 8 confirmed victories. As Commander of the 61st Squadron, Gabreski continued to chalk up victory after victory, and on seven different occasions he achieved two victories during the same mission. However, in July of 1944 Gabreski damaged the prop on his Jug during a low level attack on an airfield near Coblenz. Forced to make a crash landing, he was captured and remained a prisoner of war until Wars end in 1945. Following the War Gabreski returned to military service with the Air Forces 4th Fighter-Interceptor Wing in Korea. Flying the F-86 Sabre Jet, Gabreski attained 6.5 more aerial victories in 1951 and 1952 becoming an ace in two different wars
Signatures for : 332nd Fighter Group
A list of all signatures from our database who are associated with this squadron. A profile page is available by clicking their name.
NameInfo

Capt Howard Baugh
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Capt Howard Baugh

Flew with the 332nd Fighter Group, the Tuskegee Airmen. Captain Howard L. Baugh was born in Petersburg, Virginia. He joined the U.S. Army Air Corps in March of 1942. He was with the 99th Fighter Squadron in Sicily in July 1943 and flew 135 operational sorties in P-40s and P-51s. He struck artillery batteries, truck convoys and radar installations. Other duties were escorting B-17 and B-24 formations. He shared a Fw190 victory and retired with the rank of Lieutenant Colonel.



Captain Roscoe Brown
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Captain Roscoe Brown

After graduating for pilot training from the Tuskegee Army Air base in March 1944, he was deployed to Italy to join the 100th Fighter Squadron, 332nd Fighter Group - the Tuskegee Airmen - flying their famous red tailed P-51 Mustangs on bomber escort duties. On 24th March 1945 whilst escorting B-17s on a bombing mission to Berlin he shot down an Me262 after the formation was attacked by the German jets and a week later also shot down an Me109. Promoted to command the 100th Fighter Squadron, he flew 68 combat missions.



Lieutenant Colonel Leo R Gray
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by Lieutenant Colonel Leo R Gray
Lieutenant Colonel Leo R Gray

Leo Gray graduated as a pilot in one of the final classes from Tuskegee and was immediately posted to fly in combat with the Red Tails in the 100th Fighter Squadron. Arriving in Ramitelli, Italy, on March 14th 1945 he very quickly has a close encounter with two Me262s while escorting home a damaged P38. Flying on long range escort missions in the P51, he also flew P40s and P47s in combat. Gray flew 15 combat missions in P-51s for a total of 750 hours flying time. He left active duty in 1946, but remained in the USAF Reserves until 1984. During his 41 years of military service, Lieutenant Colonel Gray earned a Coveted Air Medal with one Oak Leaf cluster and a Presidential Unit Citation.



Lieutenant Colonel George E Hardy
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Lieutenant Colonel George E Hardy

After graduating from Tuskegee Army Air Field, George joined the 99th Fighter Squadron, 332nd Fighter Group at Ramitelli, Italy in 1945, and flew 21 combat missions in the P51 Mustang on bomber escort missions in B29s, and during the Vietnam War flew 70 combat missions in AC-119K gunships.



Lieutenant Colonel William H Holloman III
Click the name above to see prints signed by Lieutenant Colonel William H Holloman III
Lieutenant Colonel William H Holloman III

Flew P51s with 99th Fighter Squadron, 332nd Fighter Group during World War II, and after the war he flew P-47 Thunderbolts with the 301st Fighter Squadron. During the Korean War he was a Military Air Transport pilot picking up wounded soldiers for return to the US, and became the first black helicopter pilot in the US Air Force. After leaving the Air Force he became an airline pilot but was recalled to active duty in 1966, serving in Vietnam, Europe, and later returned to the Western Pacific.



Second Lieutenant Elbert Hudson
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Second Lieutenant Elbert Hudson

In September 1942 elbert Hudson joined up and went for pilot training at the Tuskegee flight school, graduating as a fighter pilot on P51Bs. He soon found himself posted to the 332nd fighter Group in Europe, where he undertook the first of many combat missions in June 1944. Elbert flew combat with the 332nd right through until the end of hostilities in May 1945.



Lieutenant Colonel Alexander Jefferson
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Lieutenant Colonel Alexander Jefferson

Alexander joined the Red Tails 332nd Fighter Group at Ramitelli, Italy, flying long range escort missions for B17 and B24 bombers. On August 12th 1944, three days prior to the invasion of Southern France. he was shot down by ground fire while strafing coastal radar installations, spending the rest of the war as a PoW, and was liberated by General Pattons 3rd Army. On his return to the USA he became an instructor at Tuskegee Field.



Lt Col Charles Lane
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by Lt Col Charles Lane
Lt Col Charles Lane

Flew with the 332nd Fighter Group, the Tuskegee Airmen. Flight Officer Charles A. Lane Jr. was born in St. Louis, Missouri. He attended the Harriett Beecher Stowe Teachers College, but studies were interrupted in 1943 when he entered the forces. He flew 26 combat missions in P-47s and P-51s with The Tuskegee, in the 99th Squadron. He was in the forces for 27 years, flying fighters, transports and the B-52. He has The Air Medal with 3 O.L.C.s, and retired as a Lieutenant Colonel.



1st Lt Robert Martin
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by 1st Lt Robert Martin
1st Lt Robert Martin

Flew with the 332nd Fighter Group, the Tuskegee Airmen. 1st Lieutenant Robert L. Martin was born in Dubuque, Iowa. He flew with 100 Fighter Squadron and has 631/2 missions to his credit. On March 3rd, 1945, he was shot down by ground fire over Zagreb aerodrome (Yugoslavia) and parachuted from the burning airplane. He was rescued by Yugoslav partisans but was not captured by the Germans. He spent five weeks in Yugoslavia and then returned to Italy by truck and plane. Decorations include DFC, Purple Heart and Air Medal with 6 OLC's.



Colonel Charles McGee
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by Colonel Charles McGee
Colonel Charles McGee

Charles McGee graduated from flight school and shipped out to Italy in December 1943 as a flight Lieutenant in the 302nd fighter Squadron, 332nd Fighter Group. He flew missions in North Africa, Italy and Germany, and got his first victory on 24th August flying escort in the Ploesti oil field raid. After the war this outstanding flyer commanded fighter squadrons throughout the United States, Italy, the Philippines and Germany, logging up more than 6,100 hours in 409 combat missions spanning World War II, Korea and Vietnam. Serving in the armed forces for 30 years he holds the record of flying more combat missions than any other USAF pilot in history. Born in Cleveland, Ohio in 1919, Charles MeGee, who was to become a Command Aviator who would fly combat missions in three different military conflicts, spent his childhood in Ohio, Illinois, and Iowa. Following two years attending the University of Illinois, WW 11 began, and McGee was sworn into the US Army enlisted reserves on October 26, 1942. He was accepted for pilot training in November and entered the Army Air Corps Aviation Cadet Training Program. McGee earned his wings and was commissioned as a Second Lieutenant in June 1943, as a member of Class 43-F at Tuskegee Army Air Field. He was assigned along with many of the other black pilots who had earned their wings at Tuskegee to the 332 nd Fighter Group in Italy. With the 302nd Fighter Squadron McGee trained in the P-40 and would later fly more than 82 tactical missions in the P-39. His fighter group was then transferred into the Fifteenth Air Force and he first flew the P-47 and several weeks later the P-51 Mustang. In this duty, along with other Tuskegee Airmen, McGee performed admirably surmounting many of the unfortunate hurdles placed in their path. The Tuskegee Ainnen became known for their superlative effort at protecting allied bombers from attacking German fighters. McGee is credited with downing one Fw- 190, and the destruction or damage of many others on the ground. He became a flight leader, was promoted to Captain, and after flying 54 more combat missions, returned to Alabama as a twin engine flight instructor. In 1950 McGee flew 100 more combat missions with the 67th Fighter Bomber Squadron of the 18th Fighter Group. He was then made Commander of the 44th Bomber Squadron flying out of Clark Field in the Philippines. Later he would serve with an F-89 Interceptor Squadron, and following a number of interesting operational and staff assignments he would serve as Commander of the 16th Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron deployed in Vietnam. In his year in Vietnam, McGee would fly another 173 missions. Later assignments included Air Liason Officer for USAEUR and 7th Army, Chief of Maintenance for the 50th Tactical Fighter Wing, Director of Maintenance Engineering for AF Communication Service, and Commander of Richards-Gebaur AFB, and the 1840 Air Base Wing. He retired from the USAF in 1973 with 6,300 flying hours, including 1,100 hours flown on fighter combat missions. Col. McGee earned a BA Degree in Business Administration and worked for many years in the real estate business with ISC Financial Corporation. He also served as Director of Administration forthe city of Prairie Village, Kanasas, and as Manager of the downtown Kansas City Airport. Now fully retired Charles lives with his wife, the former Frances Nelson of Champaign, Illinois. The McGees have three children, ten grandchildren, and five great grandchildren. His numerous decorations include the Legion of Merit with one cluster, the Distinguished Flying Cross with two clusters, the Bronze Star, the Air Medal with 25 clusters, the Army Commendation Medal, the Air Force Commendation Medal with one cluster, a Presidential Unit Citation, and the Korean Presidential Unit Citation, to name only a few.



Second Lieutenant Lowell Steward
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Second Lieutenant Lowell Steward

Entering the Tuskegee flight school for training in july 1942, Lowell steward graduated as a fighter and was posted to Europe to join the 100th Fighter Squadron, 332nd fighter Group flying P51s. During his service Lowell flew 143 combat missions with the 100th FS, and remained in the service until July 1946.



Lt Col William Wheeler
Click the name above to see prints signed by Lt Col William Wheeler
Lt Col William Wheeler

Flew with the 332nd Fighter Group, the Tuskegee Airmen.


See our aviation history timeline for all today's historical aviation events - air victories, aircraft losses and pilot details.

RECENT UPDATES TO OUR AVIATION HISTORY DATABASES
Updates made to Aircrew database for : Sergeant John Henry Hanne : First name updated (now John Henry), Service number updated (now 564212), Squadron service dates updated
Updates made to Airframes database for : Wellington T2610 : Airframe notes updated (added 10-02-1941 : Wellington lost engine power and ditched into the North Sea. The injured crew were rescued by the SS Tovelil two days later.)
Updates made to Aircrew database for : Warrant Officer Stanley F Paddy Hope : First name updated (now Stanley F Paddy), Squadron service dates updated
Updates made to Aircrew database for : Matthewman : Squadrons updated (added No.51 Sqn RAF), Squadron service dates updated
Updates made to Aircrew database for : R. Anderson : Squadrons updated (added No.83 Sqn RAF), Squadron service dates updated
Hoy added to aircrew database.
Updates made to Airframes database for : Whitley P4974 : Airframe notes updated (added 11-02-1941 : Whitley was ordered to divert course but misunderstood order and subsequently ran out of fuel, successfully abandoned. )
Pilot Officer Andrew Patrick Gilmour added to aircrew database :
Killed aged 26 on 4th July 1943 when his Stirling BK718 WP-M of No.90 Sqn was shot down and crashed near Cologne. He is buried in Overloon War Cemetery. Son of Andrew Patrick Gilmour and Annie Gilmour, husband of Hilda Gertrude Gilmour, of Laindon, Essex.
Flight Lieutenant Roy Pengilley added to aircrew database :
A pilot with 625 Sqn before being chosen for Pathfinders on Lancasters, joining 582 Sqn and completing 59 operations. Roy was wounded on a daylight operation spending two months in hospital, finally completing his tour in March 1945.
Updates made to Aircrew database for : Bell : Squadrons updated (added No.58 Sqn RAF), Squadron service dates updated
SEARCH OUR AVIATION HISTORY DATABASES

 

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